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Full text of "Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society"

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LIBRARY 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

BOSTON 

PRESENTED BY 

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1937 

YEAR BOOK 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




WITH THE 

ANNUAL REPORTS 

FOR 1936 

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Foreword 



• The Committee on Lectures and Publications has 
the honor to present herewith the fourteenth number 
of the Society's Year Book, with which is combined 
the annual reports for the year 1936. 

Winthrop L. Carter, Chairman. 
Boston, Mass. 
May 15, 1937. 



Table of Contents 

Foreword 3 

Officers for 1937 9 

Committees for 1937 11 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1936 ...... 13 

Special Awards in 1936 21 

Harlan P. Kelsey .21 

Elmer D. Smith 24 

Robert M. Grey 25 

Norman Taylor 25 

Rufus Whitaker Stimson 25 

Unusual Flowering and Fruiting Shrubs 26 

Garden Clubs Not Members of the Massachusetts 

Federation 30 

Exhibitions in 1937 44 

Library Accessions 47 

Plants Presented the Society 54 

Periodicals Received, 1936 .55 

Gifts to the Library 61 

Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission ... 63 

Necrology 65 

Annual Meeting, 1937 69 

President's Address 69 

Report of the Secretary 71 

Report of the Treasurer 75 

Report of the Committee on the Library 85 

Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 87 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 91 

Report of the Committee on Lectures and Publications 91 
Report of the Committee on the Products of Children's 

Gardens 92 

The Result of the Balloting 93 

Honorary Member 95 

Corresponding Members 95 

New Members, 1936 98 

Form of Bequest 109 



List of Illustrations 

Robert H. Roland, Trustee 8 

Harlan P. Kelsey 10 

Lord Aberconway and C. Frederick C. Stout ..... 12 

Robert M. Grey 22 

Elmer D. Smith 22 

Norman Taylor 23 

Rufus W. Stimson . 23 

Egbert Hans, painting scenery for the Spring Show . . 34 

Section of Holland scene at the Spring Show 36 

Dutch garden exhibit of Mrs. Maurice J. Curran .... 37 

Orchid exhibit of L. Sherman Adams 38 

Woodland exhibit of Alexander I. Heimlich . . . . .39 

Exhibit of the Massachusetts Audubon Society .... 40 

Exhibit of the Cohasset Garden Club 41 

Exhibit of the Cape Ann Garden Club 42 

Exhibit of the Chestnut Hill Garden Club 43 

Bodnant, Lord Aberconway 's estate . , 45 

Porch of the residence of Mrs. Charles S. Jenney .... 46 

Chrysanthemum exhibit of S. Z. Mitchell in New York . . 64 

Tulip garden of Mrs. F. F. Brewster, which was awarded 

the Albert C. Bur rage gold vase . . . . . . . .66 

Royal Horticultural Society's cup 68 

Sweet pea exhibit of Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield ... 73 

Peony exhibit of the Cherry Hill Nurseries 77 

Gladiolus exhibit of Bancroft Winsor 81 

Chrysanthemum exhibit of Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield 86 

Grape exhibit of Dr. Walter G. Kendall 94 

Chrysanthemum exhibit of C. C. Walker 97 




Mr. Robert H. Roland 
Elected a Trustee at the annual meeting, May 3, 1937 



Photo by Bachrack 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



President 
EDWIN S. WEBSTER 

Vice-Presidents 

Oakes Ames 
William Ellery 



Trustees 



John S. Ames 
Oakes Ames 
Francis H. Appleton 
George Butterworth 
Winthrop L. Carter 
Miss Marian R. Case 
Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby 
Charles K. Cummings 
William Ellery 
Mrs. Homer Gage 



Samuel J. Goddard 
Walter Hunnewell 
Harlan P. Kelsey 
Nathaniel T. Kidder 
Robert H. Roland 
Harold S. Ross 
Louis A. Shaw 
Robert G. Stone 
Mrs. Bayard Thayer 
Mrs. Roger S. Warner 



Edwin S. Webster 

Treasurer 

John S. Ames 



Secretary 
Edward I. Farrington 




Mr. Harlan P. Kelsey 
Awarded the George Robert White Medal of Honor in 1936 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 2, 1938 

Executive Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER, Chairman 

OAKES AMES WILLIAM ELLERY 

JOHN S. AMES MRS. BAYARD THAYER 

Finance Committee 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER, Chairman 

JOHN S. AMES ROBERT G. STONE 

Membership Committee 

MRS. HOMER CAGE, Chairman 

WINTHROP L. CARTER LOUIS A. SHAW 

Committee on Exhibitions 

WILFRID WHEELER, Chairman 

WILLIAM ELLERY THOMAS MILNE 

SAMUEL J. GODDARD VEASEY F. PEIROE 

Committee on Prizes 

WILLIAM ELLERY, Chairman 

WALTER HUNNEWELL ROBERT H. ROLAND 

JAMES METHVEN FLETCHER STEELE 

Committee on Library 

NATHANIEL T. KIDDER, Chairman 

MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY CHARLES K. CUMMINGS 

Committee on Lectures and Publications 

WINTHROP L. CARTER, Chairman 

LOUIS A. SHAW ROBERT G. STONE 

Committee on Special Medals 

OAKES AMES, Chairman 

WILLIAM ELLERY HAROLD S. ROSS 

HARLAN P. KELSEY WILFRID WHEELER 

Committee on Gardens 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 

MRS. JOHN S. AMES GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 

MRS. ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. LOUIS A. SHAW 

Committee on Building 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS, Chairman 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 

Committee on Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

MISS MARIAN ROBY CASE, Chairman 

THOMAS P. DOOLEY DANIEL W. O'BRIEN 

Committee on the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

WALTER HUNNEWELL, Chairman 

ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. ROBERT H. ROLAND 

WILLIAM ELLERY HAROLD S. ROSS 

Nominating Committee 
MISS MARIAN ROBY CASE HARLAN P. KELSEY 

CHARLES K. CUMMINGS LOUIS A. SHAW 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 




Two Distinguished Visitors 

The Spring flower show in March 1937 was made notable by the attend- 
ance, as a special guest, of Lord Aberconway (right) president of the 
Royal Horticultural Society. Lord Aberconway acted as one of the 
judges and made an address at the Society's dinner held in Horticultural 
Hall on the evening of March 13. Another honored guest was Mr. C. 
Frederick C. Stout (left) president of The Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society. Mr. Stout also acted as one of the judges. 



Medals and Certificates Awarded 

in 1936 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 
Mrs. Frederick F. Brewster, for a tulip garden at the Spring Show. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Harlan Page Kelsey, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Elmer D. Smith, for his success in hybridizing chrysanthemums. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

Robert M. Grey, superintendent Atkins Institution of the Arnold Arbo- 
retum in Cuba for many years, for his work in hybridizing citrus 
fruits. 

President's Cup 

Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the Horticultural Society of New York 

Will C. Curtis, for a woodland scene at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Miss Elizabeth A. Downs, for a group of cymbidiums. 

Silver Cup 

A. Frylink & Sons, Inc., for an exhibit of daffodils. 

Crystal Vases 

Edwin S. Webster, for an exhibit of daffodils. 
Edwin S. Webster, for an exhibit of tulips. 

Gold Medals 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids. 
Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for an azalea border at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. F. F. Brewster, for a bulb garden at the Spring Show. 
Bristol Nurseries, Inc., for a hardy chrysanthemum garden. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a combined exhibit of peonies, rhododen- 
drons, and azaleas. 
Corliss Brothers, Inc., for a rock wall garden at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield, for a display of sweet peas. 
Mrs. Maurice J. Curran, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. John S. Curtis, for a display of vegetables. 
Will C. Curtis, for a woodland scene at the Spring Show. 
Miss Elizabeth S. Downs, for a group of cymbidiums. 
Ormond Hamilton, for a woodland scene at the Spring Show. 

13 



14 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Alexander I. Heimlich, for a garden at the Spring Show. 

Herb Society of America, for an Old World bee garden. 

Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Charles S. Jenney, for a porch overlooking a garden. 

Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., for a garden at the Spring Show. 

Dr. Walter G. Kendall, for a display of grapes. 

Massachusetts Department of Conservation, for a naturalistic conser- 
vation scene at the Spring Show. 

Massachusetts State College, for an educational exhibit at the Spring 
Show. 

S. Z. Mitchell, for a chrysanthemum garden at the New York show. 

North Shore Horticultural Society, for a garden at the Spring Show. 

A. N. Pierson, Inc., for a display of roses. 

Thomas Roland, Inc., for a group of acacias. 

Richard H. Stiles, for a display of herbs. 

Norman Taylor, for his work as editor of "The Garden Dictionary." 

Mrs. John Barnes Townsend, sweepstake prize, dahlia classes, at Phila- 
delphia show. 

Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a group of hardy lilies. 

Charles C. Walker, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Watuppa Orchards, for a display of apples and pears. 

Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an azalea border at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a collection of cypripediums. 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of clivia. 

L. Sherman Adams Company, for a group of orchids. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for a collection of herbs. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for the best trade exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Joseph Breck and Sons, for a display of annuals. 

Butterworth's, for a group of orchids (2). 

F. I. Carter and Sons, for a group of cacti and succulents. 

Corliss Brothers, Inc., for a display of hardy herbaceous perennials. 

William N. Craig, for a table rock garden. 

Will C. Curtis, for a display of medicinal herbs used by the American 

Indians. 
Will C. Curtis, for a collection of native orchids. 
Will C. Curtis, for a naturalistic planting of hardy ferns. 
George Earney, for the most points in the seedling dahlia classes. 
A. Frylink and Sons, Inc., for the best daffodil bloom in the show 

(Therapia). 
Mrs. Homer Gage, for a bulb garden at the Spring Show. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1936 15 

George P. Gardner, Jr., for a group of plants. 

Mrs. 0. M. Godfrey, for a large terrarium. 

Ormond Hamilton, for a rock garden at the Spring Show. 

F. W. Hunnewell, for a group of orchid plants. 

Massachusetts Audubon Society, for a portion of the Plum Island Bird 
Sanctuary at the Spring Show. 

Hilda Masterson, for an aquarium at the Spring Show. 

North Street Greenhouses, for a group of fibrous or flowering begonias. 

North Street Greenhouses, for a group of rex begonias. 

Charles E. Pettengill, Essex County Agricultural School, for a science 
educational exhibit. 

Thomas Roland, Inc., for a group of Acacia cultriformis. 

Thomas Roland, Inc., for a group of saintpaulias. 

Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for a group of Turnford Hall begonias. 

Professor A. P. Saunders, for an exhibit of seedling peonies. 

Allan Sim, for a vase of Klondike snapdragons. 

Richard H. Stiles, for a bird feeding station. 

Rufus W. Stimson, for his work in stimulating the study of horticul- 
ture, and for his long and excellent service. 

Walter Tataronis, Essex County Agricultural School, Judging and 
Identification Contest at the Spring Show. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, for a display of gladioli. 

W. T. Walke and Sons, for a group of amaryllis. 

Watuppa Orchards, for a collection of apples. 

Fred P. Webber, for a display of miniature dahlias. 

Weston Nurseries,' Inc., for a group of heather. 

Eric Wetterlow and Son, for a group of achimenes. 

Wheaton College, for a terrarium. 

James Wheeler and Son, for a display of calla lilies. 

James Wheeler and Son, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Bronze Medals 

Joseph Breck and Sons, for an artistic trade exhibit at the Spring Show. 

W. Atlee Burpee Company, for an artistic trade exhibit at the Spring 
Show. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for seedling peonies. 

William N. Craig, for a display of rock plants. 

Charles K. Cummings, for a basket of Lantana delicatissima. 

Will C. Curtis, for a naturalistic planting of hardy ferns. 

Mrs. H. G. Cutler, for a group of annuals. 

Edgell Road Gardens, for a group of unusual rock plants. 

Essex County Agricultural School, for an exhibit of tools. 

Gibbs Brothers, for a group of hydrangeas. 

James Goodale, Essex County Agricultural School, Judging and Iden- 
tification Contest at the Spring Show. 



16 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Jamaica Plain High School, for a collection of cut hardy shrubs and 

trees. 
Jamaica Plain High School, for an exhibit of the products of the boys 

summer practice. 

Andrew R. Kennedy, Inc., for an artistic trade exhibit at the Spring 
Show. 

J. J. LaMontagne & Son, for a display of gourds. 

J. J. LaMontagne & Son, for a display of Indian corn. 

Henry Lott, Jamaica Plain High School, Judging and Identification 
Contest at the Spring Show. 

Martin and Farragut Schools, for a school exhibit. 

Chester Paskow, Jamaica Plain High School, Judging and Identifica- 
tion Contest at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. M. M. Van Beuren, for a group of cyclamen. 

Vaughan's Seed Store, for an artistic trade exhibit at the Spring Show. 

Bronze Medals for Children's Gardens, Donated by 

Miss Marian Roby Case, Hillcrest Gardens, 

Weston, Massachusetts 



Wilfred Allen, Sudbury. 
George Babits, Greenfield. 
Harvey Billings, Cummington. 
Barbarba Burke, Fbrestdale. 
Russell Champlin, Westfield. 
Francis Cox, Randolph. 
Norman Demarais, W. Bridgewater. 
James Doherty, South Lincoln. 
Ralph Elgh, Rutland. 
Marion Foote, Lee. 
Adelbert Gooch, Assinippi. 
Peter C. Haldoupis, Sudbury. 
Seth Hamblin, Marstons Mills. 
Robert Henderson, Sherborn. 
Kenneth Johnson, Orange. 



Lloyd Lawson, Brockton. 
Henry J. Lott, Cambridge. 
Arno Norman, Brockton. 
Chester J. Paskow, Cambridge. 
Wesley Place, Brockton. 
Algerd Ramarka, Haverhill. 
Rawson Brothers, Pittsfield. 
Edward Roberts, Granville. 
Rocha Brothers, Somerset. 
Lawrence Seling, Waltham. 
Francis Sutherland, Chesterfield. 
Ellen Swanson, Rehoboth. 
George Toohill, Cochituate. 
Frederick Usher, Danvers. 
Raymond Vaill, Monson. 



First Class Certificates 

Carnation Anita, exhibited by William Sim Carnation Co., Inc. 
Carnation Maytime, exhibited by William Sim Carnation Co., Inc. 
Carnation Siren, exhibited by William Sim Carnation Co., Inc. 
Chrysanthemum Sunburst, exhibited by V. R. DePetris. 
Cymbidium Francis Barbour, Baldwin's var., exhibited by George E. 

Baldwin and Company. 
Dendrobium Louis Bleriot, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Gerbera Evelyn Laye, exhibited by C. J. Van Bourgondien. 
Rose Chieftain, exhibited by Montgomery Company, Inc. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1936 17 

Award of Merit 

Aster Mrs. Charles Wilson, exhibited by William N. Craig. 
Brassocattleya Albion, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orehidvale. 
Burrageria Windsor, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orehidvale. 
Carnation Paul Revere, exhibited by S. J. Goddard. 
Carnation Discovery, exhibited by William Sim Carnation Co., Inc. 
Carnation Patrician, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne and Son. 
Carnation Robert Allwood, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne and Son. 
Carnation Sagamore, exhibited by William Sim Carnation Co., Inc. 
Carnation Wivelsfield Claret Improved, exhibited by J. J. LaMontagne 

and Son. 
Cattleya Dulce, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orehidvale. 
Cattleya triance var. Nahant, exhibited by Thomas Roland, Inc. 
Chrysanthemum Col. F. M. Alger, exhibited by V. R. DePetris. 
Chrysanthemum Fairy Queen, exhibited by V. R. DePetris. 
Chrysanthemum Japanese Imperial, Seminole seedling, exhibited by 

Louis Vasseur. 
Chrysanthemum Mrs. Mary Hooker, exhibited by Bristol Nurseries, 

Inc. 
Chrysanthemum Tagoya, exhibited by Thomas Roland, Inc. 
Chrysanthemum The Moor, exhibited by Bristol Nurseries, Inc. 
Coelogyne cristata alba, exhibited by F. W. Hunnewell. 
Cyclamen atkinsi, exhibited by William N. Craig. 
Cymbidium Dorchester, exhibited by Miss Elizabeth A. Downs. 
Cymbidium Francis Barbour, var. Golden Glow, exhibited by George E. 

Baldwin and Company. 
Cymbidium Magpie, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Anne Davis, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Baldur, Westonbirt var., exhibited by L. Sherman Adams 

Company. 
Cypripedium Chrystanton, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Grace Darling, var. Purity, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. 

Burrage, Orehidvale. 
Cypripedium Hestia, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Hunsworth, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Lawnacres, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Sir Trevmoore, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Com- 
pany. 
Cypripedium Warrior, Green's var., exhibited by L. Sherman Adams 

Company. 
Freesia Maryon, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Marigold Yellow Supreme, exhibited by Joseph Breck and Sons. 
Neomoorea irroatta, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orehidvale. 
Odontioda Hiawatha, West Point var., exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. 

Burrage, Orehidvale. 



18 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Oncidium splendidum var. Sulphur, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams 

Company. 
Rose Tom Thumb, exhibited by The Conard-Pyle Company. 
Rose Golden Glow, exhibited by Brightridge Dairy Greenhouses. 
Saintpaulia Blue Boy, exhibited by Thomas Roland, Inc. 
Stanhopea granddflora, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale. 

Vote of Commendation 
Brassolseliacattleya Freda, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, 

Orchidvale. 
Carnation Grenadier, exhibited by William Sim Carnation Co., Inc. 
Carnation King Cardinal, exhibited by Baur-Steinkamp and Company. 
Carnation Pink Treasure, exhibited by Baur-Steinkamp and Company. 
Carnation Purity, exhibited by Peter Beuerlein's Sons. 
Chrysanthemum Japanese Imperial, Cherokee seedling, exhibited by 

Louis Vasseur. 
Chrysanthemum King Midas, exhibited by Bristol Nurseries, Inc. 
Cymbidium George E. Baldwin var. Eclipse, exhibited by George E. 

Baldwin and Company. 
Cypripedium Chardmore var. W. H. Page, exhibited by L. Sherman 

Adams Company. 
Cypripedium Gwen Hannen, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, 

Orchidvale. 
Cypripedium Mrs. James Ingram, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams 

Company. 
Cypripedium Sir Actaeus, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Company. 
Freesia Maryon, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, 
Freesia Sunset, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Freesia Tangerine, exhibited by Mrs, R. M. Saltonstall. 
Gladiolus cooperi, exhibited by William E. Clark. 
Leucocoryne ixioides odorata, exhibited by Joseph Breck & Sons. 
Lycaste tunstilli, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale. 
Nasturtium Golden Giant, exhibited by W. Atlee Burpee Company. 
Nasturtium Scarlet Giant, exhibited by W. Atlee Burpee Company. 
Oncidium Purple King, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchid- 
vale. 
Primula sinensis stellata Avalanche, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Rose Gloaming, exhibited by Thomas Roland, Inc. 
Rose Princess Van Orange (Polyantha), exhibited by Thomas Roland, 

Inc. 
Tomato Minute Man, exhibited by Anthony Waters. 
Viola Chantreyland, exhibited by William N. Craig. 

Cultural Certificate 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, for Azalea indica Jean Harens. 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, for Azalea indica var. Elborine plena. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1936 19 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown, for an azalea seedling. 

Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale, for the cattleya G. P. Walker. 

Butterworth's, for Odontoglossum grande. 

William N. Craig, for Cypripedium insigne. 

Mrs. John S. Curtis, for specimen cyclamen. 

Mrs. John S. Curtis, for Schizanthus wisetonensis. 

Gardner Museum, for a group of lilies, cinerarias and stocks. 

F. W. Hunnewell, for Ccelogyne cristata. 

F. W. Hunnewell, for a group of orchid plants. 

Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for a calceolaria hybrid. 

James Semple, for Dimorphotheca ecklonis. 

C. J. Van Bourgondien, for a group of gerberas. 

Edwin S. Webster, for a gloriosa. 

Edwin S. Webster, for Rhododendron taylori. 

Charles W. Young, Watuppa Orchards, for the culture of apples. 

Vote of Thanks 

Mrs. L. 0. Anderson, for a dish garden. 

Pietro Antonangeli, for the abutilon Savitz. 

Pietro Antonangeli, for Browallia speciosa. 

Aquarium Club of Teacher's College, for a log garden. 

Brightridge Dairy Greenhouses, for the rose Golden Climber. 

L. G. Bruggemann, for Fordhook bush lima beans. 

Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale, for Dendrobium farmeri. 

Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Seahome, for a group of cyclamen. 

F. I. Carter and Sons, for a group of living stones. 

William N. Craig, for Lachenalia tricolor. 

Mrs. Maurice J. Curran, for Leptosyne maritime. 

Mrs. Maurice J. Curran, for the snapdragon White Rock. 

T. F. Donahue, for a collection of peonies. 

Mrs. George Fearing, for a. group of narcissi. 

Fraser's Flowers, for Flaming Velvet petunias. 

S. J. Goddard, for the carnation Hermosa. 

Sidney Hoffman, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

W. B. Hunt, for crassula plants. 

J. C. Kelly, for Winter Banana apples. 

Dr. G. E. Leontine, for an anthurium. 

Dr. G. E. Leontine, for a collection of tropical plants. 

Dr. G. E. Leontine, for Hymenocallis calathina. 

Dr. G. E. Leontine, for Hymenocallis fragrans. 

Dr. G. E. Leontine, for Ornithogalum bracteatum. 

Lowthorpe School of Landscape Architecture, for a potting shed at the 

Spring Show. 
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Marcy, for a vase of dahlia-flowered zinnias. 
Mrs. Arthur S. Merrill, for a terrarium. 



20 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Heinrich Rohrbach, for golden nettle. 
Heinrich Rohrbach, for tomatoes grafted on potatoes. 
Thomas Roland, Inc., for the hybrid tea rose Matador. 
Thomas Roland, Inc., for the saintpaulia Admiral. 
Thomas Roland, Inc., for the saintpaulia Neptune. 
Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, for Azalea indica. 
Symphony Flower Shop, for a vase of flowers. 

Mrs. Wilfrid 0. White, for a window arrangement for house plants 
with thermostatically controlled heat and humidity. 

Botanical Certificate 

Vendrobium loddigesi, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale. 
Neomoorea irroatta, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale. 
Stanhopea grandiflora, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale. 

Honorable Mention 

Anthuriums, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Seahome. 

Azaleas, exhibited by Mrs. John S. Curtis. 

Azalea Kurume, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 

Brunfelsia, exhibited by Mrs. John S. Curtis. 

Carnations — Giant Laddie, Dimity, Chief Kokomo, exhibited by J. J. 

LaMontagne and Son. 
Chrysanthemum Buttercup (pompon), exhibited by Thomas Roland, 

Inc. 
Chrysanthemum frutescens, exhibited by Mrs. John S. Curtis. 
Dendrobium pierardi, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchidvale. 
Euphorbia fulgens, Zantedeschia elliottiana, the iris Imperator and the 

iris D. Haring, exhibited by W. W. Edgar Company. 
Gentiana acaulis clusi, exhibited by William N. Craig. 
Gladiolus species, exhibited by William E. Clark. 
Hyacinth Scarlet Beauty, exhibited by Joseph Breck and Sons. 
Iris innomanata, exhibited by William N. Craig. 
Kalanchoe globulifera coccinea, exhibited by Mrs. John S. Curtis. 
Lilium candidum, the hydrangea Gertrude Glahn, the iris Imperator, 

the freesia Golden Daffodil, Daphne cneorum, exhibited by W. W. 

Edgar Company. 
Linarias, collection of annual, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Narcissi, hardy, exhibited by William N. Craig. 
Nemesia hybrids, exhibited by Joseph Breck and Sons. 
Odontioda Westminster, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, Orchid- 
vale. 
Odontoglossum McNabianum, exhibited by Mrs. Albert C. Burrage, 

Orchidvale. 
Rock garden plants, a collection of, exhibited by William N. Craig. 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 21 

Rose Blaze, exhibited by Thomas Roland, Inc. 
Stocks in variety, exhibited by Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall. 
Vanda lammelata var. Boxalli, exhibited by L. Sherman Adams Com- 
pany. 

Special Awards in 1936 

Late in 1936 the trustees, on recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Special Medals, Professor Oakes Ames, chairman, 
voted to award the George Robert White Medal of Honor to 
Mr. Harlan P. Kelsey of East Boxford, Mass. ; the Thomas 
Roland Medal to Elmer D. Smith of Adrian, Mich. ; and the 
Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal to Mr. Robert M. Grey of 
Cuba. The Trustees also voted to award the society's gold 
medal to Mr. Norman Taylor of New York and the Society's 
silver medal to Mr. Rufus W. Stimson, Supervisor of Agricul- 
tural Education in the State of Massachusetts. 

Harlan P. Kelsey 

Mr. Kelsey, who was honored by the award of the outstanding 
horticultural medal in America, has long been a Trustee of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society and for several years was 
chairman of its Exhibition Committee. He is one of the country's 
most prominent nurserymen and horticultural authorities and 
has introduced many worthwhile new plants, particularly 
those of the Southern Alleghany Mountain region — plants 
which are now being widely planted (see Horticulture, June 
15, 1936, for a full account of his work along this line) . 

Fifty years ago, Mr. Kelsey started the campaign for the use 
of hardy American plants in American gardens. Probably he 
was the first nurseryman of importance to stress this point, a 
point which was particularly important years ago, for at that 
time there was a general demand for exotic plants and little 
appreciation of the wonderful trees and shrubs native to this 
country. Mr. Kelsey was a member of the original committee 
responsible for "Standardized Plant Names" and is a member of 
the committee which is now revising this valuable work. He was 
a member of the Southern Appalachian National Park Com- 
mission which selected three new national parks — Shenandoah 
National Park in Virginia, The Great Smoky Mountain National 
Park in North Carolina and Tennessee and Mammoth Cave 



22 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




Mr. Robert M. Grey 

Awarded the 

Jackson Dawson Memorial 

Medal in 1936 



Mr. Elmer D. Smith 

Awarded, the 

Thomas Boland Medal 

in 1936 




SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 



23 



Mr. Norman Taylor 

Awarded the 

Society's gold medal 

in 1936 










Mr. Rupus W. Stimson 

Awarded the 

Society's silver medal 

in 1936 



Photo, Ye Craftsman 



24 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

National Park. For many years, he was special advisor to the 
National Park Service and made many suggestions on proposed 
areas for national parks. 

He was president of the Appalachian Mountain Club for two 
years and is a Trustee of its real estate. For two years, he was 
president of the American Association of Nurserymen and is a 
member of the Advisory Council of the National Arboretum. He 
organized the first City Planning Board in New England (at 
Salem, Mass. ) and was the first president of the Massachusetts 
Federation of Planning Boards, one of the first to be organized 
in America. He succeeded the late Ernest H. Wilson as president 
of the Horticultural Club of Boston and is an active member of 
the Massachusetts Trustees of Public Reservations. 

Mr. Kelsey was born in Pomona, Kansas, and went to North 
Carolina as a boy, spending his youth in the Carolina mountains. 
He has always retained a warm affection for these mountains 
and has introduced many of the plants growing there. 

Elmer D. Smith 

Mr. Elmer D. Smith, to whom the Thomas Roland Medal 
was awarded, may well be called the father of the modern 
chrysanthemum in America, although he has done much active 
and successful work with other flowers. He was born in 
Detroit, Mich., but has spent most of his life in Adrian. 

Mr. Smith's adoption of the greenhouse business was the 
result of his mother's love for flowers. His first greenhouse 
had brick flues for heating, but as time went on, other houses 
with water pipes were installed and still later houses with 
upright boilers for steam. As the business grew, more time 
and space were devoted to the chrysanthemum. 

Breeding had been started, and in 1890, the new chrysanthe- 
mum Flora MacDonald was disseminated. It grew so popular 
that this work was continued, and a long list of varieties rank- 
ing among the best has followed as the years have passed. In 
1927, Mr. Smith was given the degree of Master of Horticul- 
ture by the Michigan State College, and his work with chrys- 
anthemums was set forth in Special Bulletin No. 186, issued 
by that college in 1928. He has been president and secretary 
of the Chrysanthemum Society of America and was one of the 
early life members of the Society of American Florists and 
Ornamental Horticulturists. 



sPECiAii Medal awards 25 

Mr. Smith's genial personality has given him wide popular- 
ity, and he is looked up to with great respect as the dean of the 
chrysanthemum industry in America. 

Robert M. Grey 

Mr. Robert M. Grey has not had a spectacular career but 
has done much extremely important work as superintendent 
of the Atkins Institution of the Arnold Arboretum, Harvard 
University, at Soledad, Cienfuegos, Cuba. His work has been 
mostly with tropical or semi-tropical plants, as a matter of 
course, and has helped to make the Botanical Garden in Cuba 
of great value in many ways. He has played an important 
part in the introduction of new plants and in the hybridiza- 
tion of citrus fruits. He has been retired as superintendent 
emeritus. 

Norman Taylor 

Mr. Norman Taylor was given the Society's gold medal 
largely for his work as editor of "The Garden Dictionary." 
which the Special Medal Committee considered the most 
notable horticultural book which has appeared in America in 
recent years. This book represents a vast amount of research 
and is remarkably comprehensive, as well as especially free 
from inaccuracies. Mr. Taylor was formerly connected with 
the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in Brooklyn, N. Y., and later 
spent several years preparing and editing horticultural 
material for Webster's Dictionary. 

Rufus Whitaker Stimson 

Rufus Whitaker Stimson is to retire as Supervisor of Agri- 
cultural Education for Massachusetts on February 20, 1938, 
after twenty-six years, and the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society salutes him as he terminates a distinguished career of 
leadership in the training of youth for agriculture. 

Mr. Stimson, A.B. Harvard 1895, A.M. Harvard, B.D. Yale, 
was President of Connecticut Agricultural College for seven 
years, organized and directed the Smith's Agricultural and 
Industrial School in Northampton, and is called the origina- 
tor of the universally used home project method of teaching 
agriculture. He has been responsible for the development of a 
splendid program of agricultural education in Massachusetts. 



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Garden Clubs Not Members of 
the Massachusetts Federation 

Abington Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. W. S. O'Brien, Brockton Ave., Abington. 
Secretary, Mrs. Henry E. Claflin, Washington St., North Abington. 

Acton Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Curtis Fairbanks, Acton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Ivar Peterson, Acton. 

Arrangers, The 
President, Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, 20 Kilby St., Boston. 
Secretary, Mrs. Parker H. Kemble, 185 Washington St., Marblehead. 

Ashland Garden Club. 

President, Miss Jennie Cushing, Ashland. 
Secretary, Miss Charlotte Davis, Ashland. 

Attleboro Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Axel Person, 20 Bishop St., Attleboro. 
Secretary, Mrs. Carl W. Keil, 70 Lindsey St., Attleboro. 

Bernardston Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Raymond L. Dunnell, Bernardston. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. Dwight Slate, Bernardston. 

Better Homes Garden Club of Medford Hillside Mothers' Club. 

President, Mrs. F. W. Sleeper, 352 Boston Ave., Medford Hillside. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. C. Campbell, Dearborn St., Medford Hillside. 
Beverly Garden Club. 

President, Miss Edith 0. Wylie, 31 Pierce Ave., Beverly. 

Secretary, Mrs. Harold F. Fielding, 53 Friend St., Beverly. 
Beverly Improvement Society. 

President, Mrs. Frank E. Merriam, 73 Dane St., Beverly. 

Secretary, Mrs. Esther S. Alley, 29 Abbott St., Beverly. * 
Chelsea Woman's Club, Garden Club of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. Max E. Stewart, 35 Franklin St., Chelsea. 

Secretary, Mrs. Robert Huddell, 155 Garfield Ave., Chelsea. 
Clinton Woman's Club, Department of Gardens of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. A. D. Perham, 536 High St., Clinton. 

Secretary, Mrs. William Hoffman, Clinton. 
Deerfield Garden Club. 

President, Charles Huntington Smith, Deerfield. 

Secretary, Mrs. Henry C. Wells, Deerfield. 
East Bridgkwater Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Minnie Seager, Plain St., East Bridgewater. 

Secretary, Miss Gladys M. Hennessy, 386 West Union St., 
East Bridgewater. 

30 



GARDEN CLUBS NOT MEMBERS OF MASSACHUSETTS FEDERATION 31 

East Milton Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Olaf Olsen, 8 Bunton Place, East Milton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Charles B. Hoxie, 61 Washington St., East Milton. 

E aston Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. John C. Mason, 18 Day St., North Easton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Aldo D. Johnson, Seaver St., North Easton. 

Foxboro Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Benton P. Crocker, South St., Foxboro. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Dodkin, 36 School St., Foxboro. 

Georgetown Woman's Club, Garden Department of. 

President, Mrs. Irving Chesley, 138 Central St., Georgetown. 
Secretary, Mrs. Charles Legal, 146 Elm St., Georgetown. 

Groveland Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Wildon A. MacAloney, Benham St., Groveland. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. Howard Butler, 15 Philbric St., Groveland. 

Hampden Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Marion Wells Gerrish, Hampden. 
Secretary, Benjamin F. Libby, R.F.D. 1, East Longmeadow. 

Hampshire County Garden Club. 

President, Warren D. McAvoy, Village Hill Rd., Williamsburg. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. L. Judge, 169 Chestnut St., Northampton. 

Hanover Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Benjamin F. Conant, East Pembroke. 
Secretary, Mrs. Charles G. Sunergren, Hanover. 

Holden Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Franklin Hubbard, Holden. 
Secretary, Mrs. Harry W. Holton, Holden. 

Hopedale Woman's Club, Garden Department of. 

Chairman, Mrs. Albert H. Woodland, 26 Bancroft Pk., Hopedale. 
Secretary, Mrs. Harry A. Billings, 94 Dutcher St., Hopedale. 

Hubbardston Continuation Club. 

President, Mrs. Silas M. Wheeler, Main St., Hubbardston. 

Secretary, Mrs. Elwin C. Wheeler, Main St., Hubbardston. 
Hyde Park Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Frederick L. Johnson, 56 Harvard Ave., Hyde Park. 

Secretary, Mrs. Howard P. Stanley, 9 Reservoir St., Hyde Park. 

Marion Garden Lovers' Club. 

President, Mrs. Christie Tripp, Front St., Marion. 
Secretary, Mrs. Clara L. Wetmore, Hermitage Rd., Marion. 

Monson Garden Club. 

President, Henry C. Sanderson, Wilbraham Rd., Monson. 
Secretary, Mrs. Mary Louise Bradway, 3 Ely Rd., Monson. 



32 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Nahant Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Dwight Sterenberg, 100 Spring St., Nahant. 
Secretary, Mrs. Fred L. Timmins, 6 Prospect St., Nahant. 

Nbedham, The Men's Garden Club of. 
President, J. Corwin Wright, 893 Webster St., Needham. 
Secretary, Henry F. Silsby, 459 High Rock St., Needham. 

North Attleboro Garden Club. 
President, A. J. Labadie, Rear 49 Orne St., North Attleboro. 
Secretary, Harry L. Dixon, 73 South St., Plainville. 

Northampton Woman's Club, Garden Department of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. Robert R. Williams, 57 Crescent St., Northampton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Howard Hosford, 35 Maynard Rd., Northampton. 

Oxford Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. William W. Taft, Oxford. 

Secretary, Mrs. Roger Chaffee, Oxford. 
Pelham Woman's Club, Garden Group of. 

Chairman, Mrs. Guy Reed, Pelham Rd., Amherst. 

Secretary, Mrs. Ida Hunt, R.F.D., Pelham. 

Pepperell Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Benjamin Poor, Townsend. 

Secretary, Mrs. George P. Parker, East Pepperell. 
Pittsfield Garden Club. 

President, Alfred J. Loveless, 49 Easton Ave., Pittsfield. 

Secretary, Miss Marjorie Barnes, Richmond. 
Rockland Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Robert Cannaway, North Hanover. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. Carlton Prouty, 51 Albion St., Rockland. 
Shelburne Falls Garden Club. 

President, Frank P. Davison, Shelburne Falls. 

Secretary, Mrs. Fred Shontag, Shelburne Falls. 
Southboro Woman's Club, Garden Group of. 

Chairman, Mrs. Fred C. Twombly, Southville. 

Secretary, Mrs. Chester Bean, Cordaville. 
South Warren Community Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Kenneth Tuttle, R.F.D. 1, West Brookfield. 

Secretary, Mrs. D. Walker Cheney, R.F.D., Brimfield. 
Spencer Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Elsie Dickerman, 252 Main St., Spencer. 

Secretary, Mrs. Elsie Hitchings, Hillsville, Spencer. 
Stoneham Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. G. P. Hamill, Stoneham. 

Secretary, Mrs. Martin Olson, 68 Mantrale Ave., Stoneham. 



GARDEN CLUBS NOT MEMBERS OF MASSACHUSETTS FEDERATION 33 

Sunderland Woman's Club, Garden Section of. 
Chairman, Mrs. R. L. Dickinson, Sunderland. 
Secretary, Mrs. S. I. Childs, Sunderland. 

Swampscott Tuesday Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Beatrice Linehan, 32 Fuller Ave., Swampscott. 
Secretary, Mrs. Leo J. Coughlin, 5 Essex Ter., Swampscott. 

Telephone Employees' Garden Club. 
President, Charles W. Anderson, 6 Bowdoin Square, Boston. 
Secretary, Ulderic F. Hurley, 245 State St., Boston. 

Tewksbury Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. William A. Smith, Tewksbury. 
Secretary, Mrs. Alan D. Bockes, Tewksbury. 

Wellesley Men's Garden Club. 
President, Albion R. Davis, 23 Wellesley Ave., Wellesley. 
Secretary, Freeman T. Putney, 49 Clovelly Rd., Wellesley. 

West Boylston Garden Club. 

Chairman, Mrs. George Kenny, Sterling. 
Secretary, Mrs. Frank E. Adams, West Boylston. 

West Dennis Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Thomas Giles, West Dennis. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. W. Vogel, West Dennis. 

Westboro Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. George S. Maynard, Maynard St., Westboro. 
Secretary, Miss Minnie Browne, Westboro. 

Whitinsville Woman's Club Garden Group. 

Chairman, Mrs. Edmund M. Taft, 24 Hill St., Whitinsville. 
Secretary, Mrs. Edward Ballard, Main St., Linwood. 

Whitman Men's Garden Club. 

President, Merle L. Averell, 815 Washington St., Whitman. 
Secretary, Gilbert H. Emery, 56 Vernon St., Whitman. 

Whitman Women's Garden Club. 
President, Mrs. Frank A. Kirby, 37 Beulah St., Whitman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Reginald A. Conrad, 575 Bedford St., Whitman. 

Winchendon Garden Club. 

President, Mrs. Robert B. Greenwood, 22 Court St., Winchendon. 
Secretary, Mrs. George W. Gregory, 78 Spruce St., Winchendon. 

Woburn Woman's Club, The Garden Group of the. 

Chairman, Mrs. C. Fred Burdett, 605 Main St., Woburn. 
Secretary, Mrs. Alexander Perry, 66 School St., Woburn. 




Mr. Egbert Hans 

Awarded the Society's gold medal. Mr. Hans, an artist of unusual skill 
as well as an expert landscape artist, painted ail the scenery used in 
Grand Hall at the Spring exhibition in 1937 and did much to make the 
show the success it proved to be. 



EXHIBIXS 

at the 

Spring flower Show 

held at 

MECHANICS BUILDING 

March 12-18, 1937 




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EXHIBITIONS 

IN 1937 

MECHANICS BUILDING 

March 12-18. Spring Exhibition. 

HORTICULTURAL HALL 

April 29 and 30. Daffodil and Tulip Show. 

June 15 and 16. June Exhibition. 

Tuesday, 2 to 9 P.M. 
Wednesday, 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

August 18 and 19. Gladiolus Exhibition, New England 
Gladiolus Society. 

Wednesday, 2 to 9 P.M. 
Thursday, 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

August 26 and 27. Exhibition of the Products of Children's 
Gardens. 

Thursday and Friday, 1 to 6 P.M. 

September 11 and 12. Dahlia Exhibition. Dahlia Society 
of New England. 

Saturday, 2 to 9 P.M. 

Sunday, 1 to 9 P. M. 

October 5-7. Fruit, Flower and Vegetable Exhibition. 

Tuesday, 2 to 9 P.M. 

Wednesday and Thursday, 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

November 9-11. Autumn Exhibition. 

Tuesday, 2 to 10 P.M. 
Wednesday, 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Thursday, 1 to 10 P.M. 

44 




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Library Accessions 

New books added to the library during the year 1936 
include the following : 

Aiken, G. D. Pioneering with fruits and berries. 1936. 
Albaugh, B. F. Home gardening, vegetables and flowers: originally 

published under the title, The Gardenette. 1915. 
Allwood, M. C. Carnations and all dianthus; ed. 2 of Carnations for 

every garden and greenhouse. 1935. 
Alphita, a medico-botanical glossary from the Bodleian MS, Selden B. 

35 ; ed. by J. L. G. Mowat. 1887. 
American forests magazine. American conservation ,in picture and in 

story; eomp. and ed. by 0. Butler. 1935. 
American planning and civic annual; ed. by H. James. 1935-1936, 

2 vols. 
Arkell, R. Green fingers, a present for a good gardener. 1934. 
Aymard, J., fils. Les anesthesiques et le forcage des plantes. 1904. 
Barron, L., ed. Complete book of gardening. 1936. 
Bates, A. The gardener's first year. 1936. 
Bennett, J. M. Roadsides, the front yard of the nation. 1936. 
Bianco, M. Green grows the garden. 1936. 
Biddle, D. and Blom, D. Garden gossip : chronicles of Sycamore Valley. 

1936. 
Blossfeldt, K., illus. Art forms in nature, examples from the plant 

world photographed direct from nature by K. Blossfeldt. (trans.) 

1929-1932. 2 vols. 
Bois, D. Les plantes, potageres en pays tropicaux ; nouvelle ed. 1935. 
Bowers, C. G. Rhododendrons and azaleas : their origin, cultivation and 

development. 1936. 
Briquet, J. International rules of botanical nomenclature adopted . . . 

1905 and 1910 ; rev. Cambridge, 1930, comp. from the report pre- 
pared by J. Briquet. 1935. 
Britton, N. L. and Shafer, J. A. North American trees. 1908. 
Britton, W. E. Plant pest handbook for Connecticut. I. Insects. (New 

Haven, Conn. Agricultural experiment station. Bulletin 344) 1933. 
Brooklyn botanic garden. Twenty-fifth anniversary papers presented 

May 15, 16, 1935. (Memoirs, v. 4) 1936. 
Brookshaw, G. Pomona Britannica: or, A collection of the most 

esteemed fruits cultivated in this country. 1812. 
Burbank, L. How plants are trained to work for man. 1921. 8 vols. 
Burgeff, H. Samenkeimung der Orchideen und Entwicklung ihrer 

Keimpflanzen. 1936. 
Buxton, B. R. Window garden : a practical manual on soils, propaga- 
tion, potting and general care of house plants. 1936. 
Cannon, W. A. Root habits of desert plants. 1911. 

47 



48 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Carter, A. B. Shakespeare gardens, design, plants, and flower lore. 

1937. 
Childs, J. L. Guide to lily culture with descriptions of all the known 

species and distinct varieties. 1882. 
Choulant, L. Bibliotheca medico-historia, sive catalogus librorum his- 
toricorum de re medica et scientia naturali systematica ; and 
"Additamenta," by J. Rosenbaum. 1842. 
Clarke, L. J. Botany as an experimental science in laboratory and 

garden. 1935. 
Clinton, G. P. Plant pest handbook for Connecticut. II. Diseases and 
injuries. (New Haven, Conn. Agricultural experiment station. 
Bulletin 358) 1934. 
Colonial Williamsburg, Inc. A brief and true report concerning 

Williamsburg in Virginia; 2d ed. rev. 1935. 
Conder, J. Theory of Japanese flower arrangements. 1935. 
Congres international de botanique. 3me Bruxelles, 1910. Actes. 1910. 

2 vols. 
Coombs, S. V. South African plants for American gardens. 1936. 
Cross, P. G. Our friends, the trees. 1936. 

Culpeper, N. Culpeper's English physician and complete herbal im- 
proved, with corrections and arranged systematically according to 
the natural orders, by W. J. Ferrier, with a foreword by H. R. H. 
the Princess Louise. 1932. 
Cummins, J. H. Flower garden primer ; or, Gardening without tears. 

1936. 
Dahl, C. G. Morphological studies of plum flowers. (Contributions 
from the Swedish permanent committee on orchard research, no. 38) . 
1935. 
Deere, J., pub. Operation, care and repair of farm machinery. 1930 ? 
Degener, 0. Flora Hawaiiensis, vol. 2. 1934. 
Dow, A. W. Composition ; a series of exercises in art structure for the 

use of students and teachers ; 13th ed. rev. and enl. 1913. 
Dubois, G. and Dubois, F. Peter and Penny plant a garden. 1936. 
Duchene, A. Les jardins de l'avenir : hier, aujourd'hui, demain. 1935. 
Dugdale, R. S. Fragrant herbs culled from many gardens. 1935. 
Dupuy, W. A. Wonders of the plant world. 1931. 
Eaton, W. P. Wild gardens of New England. 1936. 
Kllacoinbe, H. N. Catalogue of hardy plants grown at Bitton Vicarage. 

Typescript. 1901. 
Fairburn, D. C. Plant propagation for the garden. 1936. 
Fawcett, W. and Rendle, A. B. Flora of Jamaica, vol. 7 pt. 5. 1936. 
Ferry-Morse Seed Co. Eighty years of growing, 1856-1936. 1936. 
Flexner, M. and McMeekin, I. Flowers to grow and gather. 1936. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 49 

Forster, J. England's happiness increased or, A sure and easie remedie 
against succeeding dear years : by a plantation of the roots called 
potatoes. (Photostat copy) 1664. 

Forster, J. H. Floras America? septentrionalis ; or, A catalogue of the 
plants of North America. 1771. 

Fournier, P. Les cactees et plantes grasses. 1935. 

Fraser, J. Mentha? Britannicae. (Reprint from Botanical Exchange 
Club report for 1926) 1927. 

Garden club of America. Bulletin in memory of Helen Wingate Lloyd. 
1936. 

Garden study club of Nashville, comp. History of homes and gardens 
of Tennessee, comp. by the Garden study club of Nashville ; ed. by 
R. S. Brandau. 1936. 2 pts. 

Gerard, F. Precis de l'histoire de la botanique, pour servir de comple- 
ment a l'etude du Regne vegetal . . . suivi d'un appendice de geogra- 
phic botanique . . . par J. A. Barral. 188- ?. 

Gilmore, M. R. Uses of plants by the Indians of the Missouri River 
region. (Reprint from Bureau of American Ethnology. Annual 
report 33) 1919. 

Gothein, M. L. Geschichte der garten kunst. 1914. 2 vols. 

Grainger, J. Garden science. 1935 ? 

Gratiot, J. Les orchidees, leur culture. 1934. 

Gravis, A. Recherches . . . sur le tradescantia virginica L. 1898. 

Grebenc, L. Under green apple boughs. 1936. 

Greenwell, Sister R. A. Flora of Nelson County, Kentucky with a 
selected list of economically important plants. (Catholic Univ. 
Biological series, no. 20) 1935. 

Gress, E. M. Poisonous plants of Pennsylvania. (Penn. dep't of agri- 
culture. Bulletin vol. 18, no. 5. General Bulletin no. 531) 1935. 

Gromort, G. L'art des jardins: une courte etude d'ensemble sur Fart de 
la composition des jardins d'apres des exemples empruntes a ses 
manifestations les plus brillantes. 1934. 

Hahn, B. Hurra, wir saen und ernten ! ein Gartenbuch f iir kinder. 
1935. 

Hambidge, G. Enchanted acre : adventures in backyard farming. 1935. 

Hancock, R. When I make a garden. 1936. 

The Harvard Forest, 1907-1934, a memorial to its first Director, Richard 
Thornton Fisher. 1935. 

Herrick, G. W. Insect enemies of shade trees. 1935. 

Hine, Mrs. W. R. New flower arrangements. 1936. 

Hoare, A. H. Green peas. (Great Britain. Ministry of agriculture. 
Bulletin 81) 1935. 

Hooker, J. D. Student's flora of the British Islands ; 3d ed. 1884. 

Howard, E. L. Gazebos and garden houses, a series of sketches and 
working drawings of garden buildings for your garden. 1935. 



50 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Humphrey, J. S. Bermuda houses. 1923. 

Illick, J. S. Outline of general forestry; rev. and enl. 1936. 

International botanical congress. 6th. Amsterdam, 1935. Proceedings. 
1936. 2 vols. 

International conference on genetics. 3d. London, 1906. Report; ed. 
by W. Wilks. 1907. 

International congress of genetics. 6th. Ithaca, N. Y. 1932. Proceed- 
ings, ed. by Donald F. Jones. 1932. 2 vols. 

International congress of plant breeders. Netherlands. 1936. Reports; 
ed. by M. J. Sirks. 1936. 2 vols. 

Jahandiez, E. Les plantes grasses autres que les Cactees. 1935. 

Jellicoe, G. A. Garden decoration and ornament for smaller houses. 
1936. 

Jenkins, D. H. The children make a garden. 1936. 

Johnstone, K. H., ed. Herbs. (Great Britain. Ministry of agriculture 
and fisheries. Bulletin 76) 1936. 

Jones, H. A., and Rosa, J. T. Truck crop plants. 1928. 

Kansas state board of agriculture. Trees in Kansas. 1928. 

Kenrick, W. New American orchardist; 8th ed. enl. and improved, 
with a supplement. 1846. 

Kew. Royal botanic gardens. Handlist of ferns and fern allies culti- 
vated in> the gardens ; 2d ed. 1906. 

Kew. Royal botanic gardens. Handlist of orchids cultivated in the 
gardens ; 2d ed. 1904. 

Kita-Mitsui, baron. An example of Japanese villa. (Mountain villa of 
Baron Kita-Mitsui) 1935? 

Koch, R. Das kleine Blumenbuch. 193- ? 

Korsmo, E. Ugressfr0. Unkrautsamen. Weed seeds. 1935. 

Kreiger, L. C. C. Mushroom book. 1936. 

Kuck, L. E., and Tongg, R. E. The tropical garden, its design, horti- 
culture and plant materials. 1936. 

Kumlien, L. Hill's book of evergreens. 1936. 

La Quintinye, J. de. Trattato del taglio de gl'alberi fruttif eri, del fu M. 
della Quintinye, tradatto dalla lingua Francese da N. N. 1697. 

Lloyd library and museum of botany, pharmacy, and materia medica. 
Catalogue of the periodical literature iln the Lloyd library, by W. H. 
Aiken and S. Waldbott. (Bulletin 34) 1936. 

Lochot, J. Le chrysantheme ; 6e ed. 1934. 

Loudon, J. Encyclopedia of agriculture ; 2d ed. 1831. 

Loudon, J. C, ed. Encyclopedia of gardening; ed. 4. 1826. 

Lundegardh, H. Environment and plant development; being "Klima 
und boden in ihrer wirkung auf das pflanzenleben" ; trans, and ed. 
from 2nd German edition, by E. Ashby. 1931. 

McFarland, J. H. Roses of the world in color. 1936. 

McKenny, M. The wild garden. 1936. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 51 

McMinn, H. E., and Maino, E. An illustrated manual of Pacific coast 

trees with lists of trees recommended for various uses on the Pacific 

coast by H. W. Shepherd. 1935. 
Magazine of botany and gardening — flowers, fruits and cryptogamia, 

ed. by J. Burnett, vol. 1, new series. 1936. 
Markham, V. R. Paxton and the bachelor Duke. 1935. 
Martin, R. S. How to prune western shrubs. 1935. 
Massey, W. F. Massey's garden book for the southern states. 1936. 
Matheny, W. A., ed. Seed dispersal, a student-made book. 1931. 
Matschat, C. H. The garden calendar. 1936. 

Mavor, W. Catechism of botany; or, An easy introduction to the vege- 
table kingdom. 1817. 
Merrill, E. D. Discussion and bibliography of Philippine flowering 

plants. 1926. 
Mitchell, I. S. Roads and road-making in Colonial Connecticut. 1933. 
Muenscher, W. C. Keys to woody plants ; 4th ed. rev. 1936. 
Newman, M. R., comp. Horticultural organizations of the United 

States and Canada. 1935. 
Nichols, B. and others. How does your garden grow ? 1935. 
Nicolas, J. H. A year in the rose garden. 1936. 
Nomblot, A. Traite d'arboriculture fruitiere et de pomologie. 1936. 
Pack, C. L. The war garden victorious. 1919. 
Parker, E. Gardener's England. (English scene, vol. 2) 1936. 
Peattie, D. C. Green laurels : the lives and achievements of the great 

naturalists. 1936. 
Pellett, F. C. and Pellett, M. A. Practical tomato culture. 1930. 
Perkins, E. H. Tropical fish, their breeding and care. 1936. 
Phillips, Mrs. M. E. Perennial garden. 1934. 
Pollinius, C. Flora Veronensis quam in prodromum florae Italia? sep- 

tentrionalis exhibit Cyrus Pollinius. 1822-1824. 3 vols. 
Pond, B. W. Outline history of landscape architecture, pts. 1 and 2. 

1936. 
Pray, L. L. Common mushrooms. (Field museum of natural history. 

Botany leaflet no. 18) 1936. 
Preininger, M. Japanese flower arrangement for modern homes. 1936. 
Prime, C. T. and Deacock, R. J. How to identify trees and shrubs from 

leaves or twigs in summer or winter. 1935. 
Quinn, V. Seeds, their place in life and legend. 1936. 
Ragg, L. Tree lore in the Bible. 1935. 
Repton, Humphrey. Wherstead in Suffolk, a seat of Sir Robert Har- 

landbart. (Original MS. report) 1791. 
Riabov, I. N. The problems of pollination and fertilization of fruit 

trees, survey of literature. (In Russian, summary in English) 1930. 
Ries, V. H. How to grow perennial flowers. 1936. 



52 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Ries, V. H. Plant welfare : recognition and control of pests and dis- 
eases. 1936. 

Ries, V. H. Pruning and repairing of trees, shrubs, and ornamentals. 
1936. 

Rock, J. F. C. Indigenous trees of the Hawaiian Islands. 1913. 

Rogers, W. E. Tree flowers of forest, park, and street. Drawings from 
nature by Olga Smith. 1935. 

Rohde, E. S. Herbs and herb gardening. 1936. 

Rohde, E. S. Old-world pleasaunce ; an anthology. 1925. 

Rohde, E. S. Shakespeare's wild flowers, fairy lore, gardens, herbs, 
gatherers of simples, and bee lore. 1935. 

Root, A. I. and Root, E. R. The ABC and XYZ of bee culture : a cyclo- 
pedia of everything pertaining to the care of the honeybee ; new ed. 
1935. 

Rowntree, L. Hardy Californians. 1936. 

Royal horticultural society. Cherries and soft fruits, varieties and cul- 
tivation in 1935 ; report of the conference held by the Royal horti- 
cultural society July 16 and 17, 1935. 1935. 

Royal horticultural society. Rock gardens and rock plants. Report of 
the conference held by the Royal horticultural society and the 
Alpine Garden Society ; ed. by F. J. Chittenden. 1936. 

Rubel, R. 0., Jr. Camellia culture under glass for florists. 1936. 

Salisbury, E. J. The living garden; or, The how and why of garden 
life. 1936. 

Schnack, F. Das kleine Baumbuch: die Deutschen waldbaume. 193- f 

Sewell, C. V. V. Common sense gardens, how to plan and plant them. 
1906. 

Seymour, E. L. D., ed. Garden encyclopedia: a complete, practical, and 
convenient guide to every detail of gardening. 1936. 

Shannon, H. J. The book of the seashore; the life experiences of a 
naturalist on the beach. 1935. 

Sharp, H., illus. Fruits and flowers of Bermuda, water color sketches. 
1892-1903. 

Sharp, M. Four gardens. 1935. 

Shibuya, Tsunetoshi. Morphological and physiological studies on the 
fructification of peanut. (Arachis hypogaea L.) (Memoirs of the 
Faculty of Science and Agriculture, Taihoku Imperial Univ. v. 17, 
no. 1, Sept. 1935) 1935. 

Shiga, N. and Hashimoto, M., eds. Gardens of Japan, a pictorial record 
of the famous palaces, gardens and tea-gardens, 150 plates with ex- 
planations by M. Tatsui. 1935. 

Siebold, P. F. von. Synopsis plantarum oeconomicarum universi regni 
Japonici. (Offset reproduction) 1933. 

Siiks, M. J., ed. Botany in the Netherlands; ed. for the organizing 
committee of the 6th international botanical congress. 1935. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 53 

Smith, K.M. Plant viruses. 1935. 

Society for the preservation of the landscape features of Essex County, 
Mass. Handbook of conservation with special reference to the land- 
scape features in Essex Co. 1936. 

Stel, S. van der. Simon van der Stel's journal of his expedition to 
Namaqualand, 1685-1686 ; ed. from the MS. in the library of Trinity 
College, Dublin, by G. Waterhouse. 1932. 

Sudell, R. The new garden. 1936. 

Surtees, J. Nursery cost finding : a textbook for the use of nurserymen, 
growers of fruit trees, perennials, etc. and landscape designers. 
1936. 

Tamura, T. Art of the landscape garden in Japan. 1936. 

Taylor, N., ed. Garden dictionary: an encyclopedia of practical horti- 
culture, garden management, and landscape design. 1936. 

Taylor, G. C. The modern garden. 1936. 

Thompson, H. S. Flowering plants of the Riviera: a descriptive ac- 
count of 1800 of the more interesting species. 1914. 

Tillinghast, H. M. First gourd book. 1936. 

United States department of agriculture. Atlas of American agricul- 
ture. 1936. 

United States department of agriculture. Index to department bulle- 
tins, nos, 1-1500. 1936. 

Vincent, Mme, illus. Etudes de fleurs et de fruits, peints d'apres nature 
par Mme Vincent et graves par Lambert aine. 18- f 

Viosca, P. Jr. Irises of southeastern Louisiana, a taxonomic and eco- 
logical interpretation. (Reprint from American Iris Society. Bulle- 
tin, April 1935.) 

Von Erdberg, E. Chinese influence on European garden structures, ed. 
by B. W. Pond. 1936. 

Vulliamy, C. E. Aspasia; the life and letters of Mary Granville, Mrs. 
Delany (1700-1788) 1935, 

Waksman, S. A. Humus, origin, chemical composition and importance 
in nature. 1936. 

Wardlaw, C. W. Green havoc in the lands of the Caribbean. 1935. 

Waugh, F. A. Landscape conservation : planning for the restoration, 
conservation, and utilization of wild lands for park and forest 
recreation. 1935. 

Weaver, J. E. and Bruner, W. E. Root development of vegetable crops. 
1927. 

Wenchel, J. P., comp. Laws applicable to the United States department 
of agriculture, 1935, embracing acts and provisions of a permanent 
character in force Sept. 6, 1935. 1936. 

White, E. A. Principles of flower arrangement; ed. 3. 1936. 



54 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Who's who, 1936. 1936. 

Wilder, L. B. Adventures with hardy bulbs. 1936. 

Wilkie, D. Gentians. 1936. 

Wilson, J. D. Environmental factors in relation to plant disease and 

injury, a bibliography. (Ohio agricultural experiment station. 

Technical series, Bulletin 9) 1932. 
Wister, J. C. Four seasons in your garden. 1936. 
Wood, A. H., Jr. Bulbs for your garden. 1936. 
Wood, A. H., Jr. Grow them indoors, a manual of house plants and 

their culture. 1936. 
Yanovsky, E. Food plants of the North American Indians. (United 

States department of agriculture. Miscellaneous publications, 237) 

1936. 
Yates, L. H. Country housewife's book; how to make the most of 

country produce and country fare. 1934. 
Zirkle, C. The beginnings of plant hybridization. (Morris Arboretum. 

Monograph I) 1935. 



Plants Presented the Society 

At the annual meeting of the American Orchid Society, 
which was held at Horticultural Hall, October 7, 8 and 9, 
1936, Thomas Roland, Inc., of Nahant contributed a large 
number of ornamental plants which were used for decorating 
the hall. At the end of the show, some of these plants were 
donated to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, which 
retained the following for use in the entrance hall, where they 
produce a very decorative effect : three Phoenix roebelini and 
two Areca lutescens. Those not used in this way were disposed 
of through the Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mis- 
sion, which has its headquarters in Horticultural Hall. The 
Secretary, Mrs. Lewis Elliott, reports that two dracaenas and 
a large palm went to the School for Crippled Children. A fig 
tree was sent to the Barnard Home for Aged in Hyde Park. 
Two rubber plants were found very acceptable by the Bulfinch 
Place Chapel Center, while another rubber plant went to the 
North Bennett Street Industrial School. 

Later, Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler added to the collection in the 
hall by donating a large specimen of Bhapis excelsa. 



Periodicals Received, 1936 

*Agricultura y Ganaderia. 
Agricultural Gazette of New South Wales. 
Agricultural Index. 
Agricultural Statistics. 
Alpine Garden Society. Bulletin. 
Alpine Garden Society. Year Book. 
American Amaryllis Society. Year Book. 

* American Bee Journal. 
American Botanist. *- 
American Daffodil Yearbook. 
American Dahlia Society. Bulletin. 
American Delphinium Society. Year Book. 
American Fern Journal. 

American Forests. 
American Fruit Grower Magazine. 
American Home. 
*American Hortigraphs and Agronomic Review. 
American Iris Society. Bulletin. 
American Nurseryman. 
American Orchid Society. Bulletin. 
American Peony Society. Bulletin. 
American Pomological Society. Proceedings. 
American Rose Annual. 
American Rose Magazine. 

American Society for Horticultural Science. Proceedings. 
American Society of Landscape Architects. Bimonthly Index to 

Current Publications of Professional Interest. 
Les Amis des Roses. 
Annals of Botany. 

* Aquatic Life. 

Arnold Arboretum. Bulletin of Popular Information. 

Arnold Arboretum. Journal. 

Australian Orchid Review. 

Better Fruit. 

Better Homes and Gardens. 

Blumen- und Pflanzenbau. 

Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research. Contributions. 

Breeze Hill News. 

British Gladiolus Society. Gladiolus Annual. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Leaflets. 

Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Record. 

Bryologist. 

Cactus and Succulent Society of America. Journal. 

Cactus and Succulent Society of Great Britain. Cactus Journal. 

* Library keeps only the current year on file. 

55 



56 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

*Calavo News. 
California Avocado Association. Yearbook. 
California. Department of Agriculture. Bulletin. 
California Garden. 
Canadian Entomologist. 
Canadian Florist. 

Canadian Gladiolus Society. Quarterly. 
Canadian Horticulture. 
Le Chrysantheme. 

Chrysanthemum Society of America. Bulletin. 
City Gardens Club (New York). Bulletin. 
Colorado Federation of Garden Clubs. Yearbook. 
Connecticut State Geological and Natural History Survey. 

* Country Life. New York. 
Curtis's Botanical Magazine. 
Dahlia Society of Michigan. Bulletin. 
Dein Gartchen. 

Desert Plant Life. 
*Economia y Tecnica Agricola. 

Edinburgh. Royal Botanic Garden. List of Seeds. 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. Journal. 

Euphorbia Review. 

Experiment Station Record. 

F. T. D. News. 

Farm Research. 

Federated Garden Clubs of Iowa. Iowa Gardens. 

Federated Garden Clubs of Michigan. Bulletin. 

Federated Garden Clubs of Michigan. Yearbook. 

Federated Garden Clubs of New Jersey. Yearbook. 

Federated Garden Clubs of New York. Yearbook. 

Field Museum of Natural History. Publications. Botanical Series. 
*Field Museum of Natural History. Publications. Report Series. 

* Fertilizer Review. 
Florists' Exchange. 
Florists' Review. 
Flower Grower. 

Flowering Plants of South Africa. 
Forest Leaves. 
•Forestry News Digest. 
Four Seasons. 
Fruit World of Australasia. 
Garden Club Exchange. 

Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts. Yearbook. 
Garden Club of Alabama. Yearbook. 



'Library keeps only the current year on file. 



PERIODICALS RECEIVED, 1936 57 

Garden Club of America. Bulletin. 

Garden Club of Georgia. Yearbook. 

Garden Club of Kentucky. Yearbook. 

Garden Club of North Carolina. Yearbook. 

Garden Clubs of Mississippi. Bulletin. 

Garden Design. 

Garden Digest. 

Garden Gate. ^ 

Garden Gateways. ^ 

Garden Glories, v 

Garden Gossip. 

Garden Life. ^ 

Garden Lover, v 

Garden Path. 

Garden Quarterly. 

Garden Service Bulletin. 

Gardeners' Chronicle. 

Gardeners' Chronicle of America. 

Gardening Illustrated. 

Gardens and Gardening. Studio Gardening Annual. 

Gartenflora. 

Gartenkunst. 

Gartenschonheit. 

Geisenheimer Mitteilungen uber Obst- und Gartenbau. 

Gentes Herbarum. 

Giardino Fiorito. 

Gladiolus Bulletin. 

Golden Gardens, v 

Gourd Bulletin. 

Gray Herbarium Contributions. 

Great Britain. Ministry of Agriculture. Journal. 

Hartford, Connecticut. Board of Park Commissioners. Annual 

Report. 
Harvard University. Botanical Museum. Leaflets. 
Hillcrest Gardens. 
Home Acres. 
*Home Gardening. 
Homes and Gardens of Tomorrow. 
Hooker's Icones Plantarum. 
Hoosier Horticulture. 
L'Horticulteur Chalonnaise. 
Horticultural News. 

Horticultural Society of New York. Monthly Bulletin. 
Horticultural Society of New York. Yearbook. 

*Library keeps only the current year on file. 



58 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Horticulture. 
L'Horticulture Francaise. 
House and Garden. 
House Beautiful. 
Illinois Horticulture. 

Illinois State Horticultural Society. Transactions. 
Illinois State Horticultural Society. News Letter. 
International Review of Agriculture. 
*Iowa Agriculturist. 

Ireland. Department of Lands and Agriculture. Journal. 
Iris Society (England). Yearbook. 
Japanese Horticultural Society. Journal. 
Jardinage. 

Jenkins Hemlock Arboretum. Bulletin. 
Journal of Agricultural Research. 
Journal of Botany, British and Foreign. 
Journal of Economic Entomology. 
Journal of Forestry. 

Journal of Pomology and Horticultural Science. 
Kew. Royal Gardens. Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information. 
Kew. Royal Gardens. List of Seeds. 
Landscape and Garden. 
Landscape Architecture. 
Lawn Care. 
Lexington Leaflets. 
Lingnan Science Journal. 
Linnaean Society. Journal. 
Lloyd Library. Bulletin. 

Lyon-Horticole et Horticulture Nouvelle Reunis. 
Market Growers Journal. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Year Book. 
Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters. Papers. 
Mid West Dahlia News. 
Minnesota Horticulturist. 
Missouri Botanical Garden. Annals. 
Missouri Botanical Garden. Bulletin. 
Mollers Deutsche Gartner-Zeitung. 
Monthly Catalogue of United States Public Documents. 
Monthly Checklist of State Publications. 

Montreal. Univesite. Laboratoire de Botanique. Contributions. 
Morton Arboretum. Bulletin of Popular Information. 
My Garden. 
Mycologia. 
National Auricula and Primula Society. Annual Report. 

* Library keeps only the current year on file. 



PERIODICALS RECEIVED, 1936 59 

National Carnation and Picotee Society (England). Annual Report 
and Yearbook. 

National Council of State Garden Club Federations. Bulletin. 

National Fertilizer Association. Proceedings. 

National Horticultural Magazine. 

National Nurseryman. 

National Rose Society (England). Rose Annual. 
*Natur und Volk. 
*Nature - Garden Guide. 
*Nature Magazine. 

New Current Digest. 

New England Gladiolus Society. Yearbook and Supplement. 
*New England Homestead. 

New England Wild Flower Preservation Society. Circulars. 

New Flora and Silva. 

New York Botanical Garden. Journal. 

Nord Horticole. 

North and South Dakota Horticulture. 

Northwest Gardens. ^ 

Oklahoma Gardener. 

Ontario. Department of Agriculture. Statistics Branch. Annual 
Report. 

Ontario. Horticultural Societies. Annual Report. 
*Open Shelf. 

Orchid Review. 

Oregon Federation of Garden Clubs. Yearbook. 

Oregon Horticultural Society. Annual Report. 

Ortofrutticoltura Italiana. 
*Parks and Recreation. 

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Yearbook. 

Le Petit Jardin. 
*Philippine Journal of Agriculture. 

Phytopathology. 

Plant Breeding Abstracts. 

La Pomologie Franchise. 

Popular Gardening. 

Quarterly Journal of Forestry. 

Reale Societa Toscana di Orticultura. Bulletino. 

Revista de Agricultura de Puerto Rico. 

Revue des Eaux et Forets. 

Revue Horticole. 

Rhodora. 

Rio de Janeiro. Museu Nacional. Archivos. 

Rio de Janeiro. Museu Nacional. Boletim. 



Library keeps only the current year on file. 



60 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Rodriguesia. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Daffodil Yearbook. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Journal. 

Royal Horticultural Society. Lily Yearbook. 

Rural New Yorker. 

S.A.G. 

Scientific Horticulture. 

Scottish Forestry Journal. 

Seed Trade Buyers Guide. 

Seed Trade News. 

Seed World. 

Shade Tree. 

Smithsonian Institution. Annual Report. 

Smithsonian Institution. U. S. National Herbarium. Contributions. 

* Societe d'Horticulture de la Haute-Garonne. Annales. 
*Societe d'Horticulture d'Orleans et du Loiret. Bulletin. 

* Societe d'Horticulture et de Viticulture d'Epernay. Bulletin. 
Societe Franchise du Dahlia. Journal. 

Societe Nationale d'Horticulture de France. Bulletin. 

Societe Royale de Botanique de Belgique. Bulletin. 

Societe Royale d'Horticulture et d' Agriculture d'Anvers. Bulletin. 

Southern Florist and Nurseryman. 

Southern Home and Garden. 

Success With Roses. 

* Sunset, V 
•Tennessee Horticulture. 

Torrey Botanical Club. Bulletin. 

Torreya. 

Tribune Horticole. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. Yearbook. 

Verbandsmitteilungen des Landesverbandes Sachsen fur Gartenbau. 

Verein Zum Schutze der Alpenflanzen. Jahrbuch. 
•Victoria, Australia. Department of Agriculture. Journal. 
*Waltham, Mass. Field Station. Field Station Journal. 

Washington State Federation of Garden Clubs. Yearbook. 

West Virginia Gardens. Yearbook. 

Westchester Garden and Home. 

Wild Flower. 

Wild Flower Preservation Society. Circulars. 

Wilmington Florist. 

Wisconsin Horticulture. 

Worcester County Horticultural Society. Transactions and Schedule. 

Your Garden and Home. 

Zeitschrift fiir Pflanzenkrankheiten und Pflanzenschutz. 

* Library keeps only the current year on file. 



Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with 
thanks gifts to the library from the following donors in 1936 : 
Arnold Arboretum. 

A collection of nursery catalogues. 
Benedict, L. P. 

Rainbow fragments : a garden book of the iris with illustrations in 
full color, by J. Marion Shull. 1931. 
Billings, Mrs. Edgar F. 

Encyclopedia of agriculture ; 2d ed., by J. Loudon. 1831. 
Pomona Britannica: or, A collection of the most esteemed fruits 
cultivated in this country, by George Brookshaw. 1812. 
Bois, D. 

Les plantes potageres en pays tropicaux ; nouvelle ed., by D. Bois. 
1935. 
Boston Mycological Club from the estate of Mrs. Eliza B. Blackford. 

Student's flora of the British Islands; 3d ed., by J. D. Hooker. 1884. 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. 

Twenty-fifth anniversary papers presented May 15, 16, 1935. 
(Memoirs, vol. 4) 1936. 
Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

American planning and civic annual ; ed. by Harlean James. 1935- 

1936. 2 vols. 
Wild gardens of New England, by Walter Pritchard Eaton. 1936. 
Degener, Otto. 

Flora Hawaiiensis, vol. 2, by Otto Degener. 1934. 
Dow, Dana F. 

Composition; a series of exercises in art structure for the use of 
students and teachers ; 13th ed. rev. and enl., by Arthur Wesley 
Dow. 1913. 
Farrington, E. I. 

Handbook of conservation with special reference to the landscape 
features in Essex County, by The Society for the Preservation 
of the Landscape Features of Essex County, Mass. 1936. 
Field Museum of Natural History. Chicago. 

Common mushrooms, by Leon L. Pray. (Field Museum of Natural 
History. Botany leaflet, no. 18) 1936. 
Garden Club of America. 

Bulletin in memory of Mary Helen Wingate Lloyd, by the Garden 
Club of America. 1936. 
Government Botanical Garden. Yalta, Crimea. 

The problems of pollination and fertilization of fruit trees, survey 
of literature, by I. N. Riabov. (In Russian, summary in Eng- 
lish). 1930. 

61 



62 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Lutman, B. E. 

England's happiness increased; or, A sure and easie remedie 
against succeeding dear years : by a plantaion of the roots called 
potatoes, by John Forster. (Photostat copy) 1664. 

Mann, H. 0. 

New American orchardist; 8th ed. enlarged and improved, with a 
supplement, by William Kenrick. 1846. 

Manning, Warren. 

A collection of nursery catalogues. 

Morgan, Mrs. Byron. 

Magazine of botany and gardening, flowers, fruits, and crypto- 
gamia ; ed. by James Burnett, vol. 1, new series. 1836. 

Naber, Henry L. F. 

Native flowers and ferns of the United States, by Thomas Meehan. 
1878-1880. 4 vols. 

New England Wild Flower Preservation Society. 

Fruits and flowers of Bermuda. Water color sketches, by Helen 
Sharp. 1892-1903. 

Newell, Mrs. Lyman Churchill. 

Indigenous trees of the Hawaiian Islands, by Joseph F. C. Rock. 
1913. 

Olmsted Brothers. 

Flora of Nelson County, Kentucky with a selected list of economi- 
cally important plants, by Sister Rose A. Greenwell. (Catholic 
University. Biological series, no. 20) 1935. 
Pautzsch, Arthur B. 

Operation, care and repair of farm machinery, published by John 
Deere. 1930? 

Royal Horticultural Society. 

Cherries and soft fruits, varieties and cultivation in 1935 ; report 
of the conference held by the Royal Horticultural Society July 
16 and 17, 1935. 1935. 

Tillinghast, Helen M. 

First gourd book, by Helen M. Tillinghast. 1936. 
Webster, Mr. and Mrs. Hollis. 

Catechism of botany ; or, An easy introduction to the vegetable 
kingdom, by William Mavor. 1817. 
Williams, Mrs. Francis. 

Menthas Britannicae, by John Fraser. (Reprint from the Botanical 
Exchange Club report for 1926) 1927. 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and 
Flower Mission 

For 68 years the Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower 
Mission— the oldest organization of its kind — has endeavored 
to provide the opportunity for people to share their flowers, 
fruits, vegetables and "goodies" with the sick and lonely who 
gain increased courage to face their lot through the knowledge 
that somebody cares. 

In acknowledging our indebtedness to the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society during the twelfth year 
that our headquarters have been established at Horticultural 
Hall, we desire to express grateful appreciation for the co- 
operation that has made possible the enlarged work of the 
Fruit and Flower Mission, especially the friendly interest of 
Mr. Farrington. 

Returns from the use of the large hall for the benefit lecture 
of Miss Marian Roby Case on "Portugal" enabled us to meet 
our annual budget. 

In spite of the extremely dry period of the early Summer, 
the highest total of filled hampers and baskets — 718 from 31 
towns — was received during the 1936 hamper season, 27 being 
sent from Duxbury alone on its closing day. 

A report from one of our centers told of a boy of fourteen 
who had to have treatment at a clinic and was completely 
unmanageable, causing such a commotion that they had to let 
him run away, until one day he saw the Flower Mission bou- 
quet in the waiting room. He said he liked flowers and was 
told he might have some if he would go in quietly for treat- 
ment. They never had any more trouble with him. 

At the eighty-ninth Old Ladies' Party, held annually at the 
Bulfinch Place Chapel Center, 160 elderly people from the 
homes around Boston received a bouquet from the Flower 
Mission. 

Three hundred and twelve gaily trimmed Thanksgiving, 
Christmas and Easter baskets carried cheer to many indi- 
viduals 4 . 

Our loyal and dependable corps of volunteers, including the 
cheerful and courteous railroad men, contribute largely to the 
success of the work. 

Emily I. Elliott, Executive Secretary. 

63 



Necrology 



The following is a list of the members of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society whose deaths were reported during the 
year 1936 : 



Mrs. Bessie F. Adams 

Mr. A. Barry Bacon 

Miss Bertha R. Batson 

Mr. Frank B. Bemis 

Mr. Hallie C. Blake 

Mr. Royal T. Brodrick 

Mrs. Frank Chouteau Brown 

Mrs. George H. Chandler 

Mr. John Carroll Chase 

Miss Susan W. Child 

Mrs. Eugene H. Clapp 

Mr. Robert P. Clapp 

Mr. James D. Colt 

Miss Kate E. Coney 

Mr. John A. Cook 

Mr. George D. Detlefsen 

Mrs. John Dickinson 

Mrs. Louis S. Drake 

Mrs. Fred Drew 

Mrs. Lyman K. Eddy 

Mrs. Alcott F. Elwell 

Mr. William C. Endicott 

Mr. George J. Ferreira 

Mrs. Loring Fowler 

Mr. Willard A. Frost 

Mr. George L. Gilmore 

Mrs. F. W. Gowell 

Mr. Edward Howland Robinson Green 

Mr. Oscar W. Grover 

Miss Ellen R. Hathaway 

Mr. Theodore A. Havemeyer 

Mrs. George H. Hitchcock 

Mrs. Charles H. Hood 

Mrs. Sara R. Horovitz 

Mr. John F. Howe 

Professor Marshall A. Howe 

Dr. Edward D. Hurley 

Mr. James E. Kelley 

Mr. Harry W. Knights 



Mr. Thomas P. Lennox 

Mr. Sylvester A. Lyons 

Mrs. W. H. McGaw 

Mr. Michael J. McGuire 

Mrs. W. L. McKee 

Mrs. Robert L. Middleton 

Mr. Arthur N. Milliken 

Mrs. Maria C. Molla 

Count Carl Moltke 

Mr. Arthur K. Moore 

Mrs. C. 0. Nelson 

Mrs. Fred Nichols 

Mrs. John L. Norris 

Mr. Arthur A. Osborne 

Mr. Frederick W. Paine 

Mr. Frederic E. Palmer 

Mrs. J. A. P. Patch 

Miss H. Elisabeth Perkins 

Miss Alice B. Poor 

Mr. Howard Willis Preston 

Mr. John Pritchard 

Mr. Isaac A. Racz 

Mrs. F. W. Remick 

Mrs. Charles M. Rogerson 

Mr. David J. Scott 

Mr. Llewellyn D. Seaver 

Mrs. Frederick H. Smith 

Mrs. David B. Studley 

Mrs. James M. Swift 

Mr. John H. Temple 

Mrs. F. L. Thomas 

Mrs. Artemas L. Tyler 

Miss Lucia C. Warren 

Mr. Robert Watson 

Mrs. Josie K. Webb 

Mr. Harry E. Wellington 

Miss Ellen Willmott 

Mr. George S. Wright 

Mrs. James Hayden Wright 



Mrs. George H. Young 



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MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



PRESENTED AT THE 
ANNUAL MEETING MAY 3, 1937 



WITH A LIST OF MEMBERS 
ADMITTED IN 1936 




The Royal Horticultural Society's Cup 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society was greatly honored at 
the time of the 1937 Spring show by being presented a mag- 
nificent, gold-lined silver cup, to be awarded to the amateur 
exhibit showing the greatest skill in culture and arrangement. 
This cup, which is a fine old English piece, was won by the 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum of Boston with a rare and 
unusual collection of Jasminum nudiflorum. 



Annual Meeting, 1937 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society was held in Horticultural Hall at 3 p.m. on Monday, 
May 3, being preceded by a lecture by the Secretary in which 
he reviewed the activities of the previous year, illustrating his 
talk with lantern slides. 

The President, Mr. Edwin S. Webster, presided. Following 
the reading of the call for the meeting and the minutes of the 
previous meeting by the Secretary, the President made his 
address. The Secretary, the Treasurer and the chairmen of 
the various committees then made their reports, all of which 
are appended. 

The President's Address 

It is the President's duty — and his privilege — to bring a 
message to the members of this Society at each annual meet- 
ing. It is in my mind today to say something about the 
relation of the Society to the community which it serves. I say 
"serves" deliberately, for to me service is the chief function of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. It was on the basis 
of service that the Society was organized 107 years ago. 
Service has been its watchword throughout its long existence 
and explains, I believe, why it is — with one exception — the 
oldest organization of the kind in America. It has had its poor 
years and its good years, according to the times, and in some 
measure, no doubt, to the vision and activity of those in office. 

Many of the flowers, vegetables, and fruits now in common 
cultivation were not known when this Society was formed. 
Most new varieties have been shown here as fast as they have 
been introduced, and it has been the policy of this Society to 
present them to the public for inspection. The Library has 
grown from 300 volumes to 25,000, and the knowledge con- 
tained in these books is available to all who seek it. 

The Society's income is used wholly to increase its facilities, 
and its opportunities for serving the gardening public. The 
Society has repeatedly opened its halls to other organizations 
which are working along similar — although narrower — lines. 
It has opened them, too, for charitable purposes. It has sought 
through its committees and paid employees to give the public 
what it desires in the way of exhibitions, lectures and classes. 
It is publishing and distributing at cost the outstanding horti- 

69 



70 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

cultural magazine of this country — being, indeed, the only- 
organization of this character in all the world to engage in 
such an enterprise. 

Anyone interested in horticultural matters is welcome at 
Horticultural Hall. If the secretary has one outstanding 
characteristic, it is his desire to be absolutely fair, impartial, 
and unbiased in his treatment of members and visitors alike. 
This attitude, indeed, prevails throughout the organization. 
It is a matter of comment that visitors to the Library, and to 
the various offices are invariably treated with courtesy and 
consideration — no matter whether they be estate owners or 
the humblest of employees. The Society maintains an employ- 
ment bureau for the assistance of gardeners seeking positions. 
No charge is made for the help given them. 

The members of this Society have greater facilities at their 
command than those of any similar organization in this coun- 
try — yet they pay a lower fee than that charged by any other 
large horticultural organization. 

It is the purpose of this Society to serve both commercial 
and amateur interests. In recent years, the development of 
national and state bureaus has lessened the demands from 
commercial men, but the rapidly increasing interest in horti- 
culture which has marked the last decade, and which is being 
materially helped through the extremely efficient work of the 
garden clubs, has greatly increased the demands of amateurs. 

The Society has tried to adjust itself to changing conditions. 
It has changed the types and dates of its shows to keep abreast 
of the times. It has made possible the holding of classes and 
lectures on special subjects. It has had a very important part 
in the development of school gardens, and each year it puts on 
a school garden exhibition which is not equalled anywhere else 
in the country. It works co-operatively with the 4-H clubs, and 
the various state and county institutions, and with schools like 
the Jamaica Plain High School. 

Through its affiliation with the Benevolent Fraternity 
Fruit and Flower Mission — housed in this building — it helps 
to bring comfort and cheer to hundreds of hospital patients 
and shut-ins through the distribution of flowers and fruit — a 
noble work about which little is heard. 

I could continue for a long time merely enumerating the 
activities of this Society — many of which, I fear, are wholly 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 71 

unknown to most of our members. I promised, however, that 
the reports at this meeting would be short. Brevity must gov- 
ern my remarks, too. I will say little more, therefore, except 
to reiterate the fact that this organization is conducted with 
high purpose, and with altruistic motives. It meets its ex- 
penses by careful attention to economy, and the use of busi- 
ness methods. No one receives, or expects to receive, a profit 
from its operations. Some of us give many hours of time and 
thought to the management of the Society, because of our 
interest in its work, and our pride in its success. Its expansion 
from a membership of less than 1,000 members twelve years 
ago, to almost 9,000 at the present time, leads us to hope for 
continued growth, and to anticipate the time when the Society 
can extend its activities to the western part of the state — - 
perhaps with a branch there which shall help to make it 
what it was designed by its founders to be — a state-wide 
organization. 

Edwin S. Webster, President, 

Report of the Secretary 

Doubtless, Lord Aberconway's visit to Boston was the high- 
light of the past year. As president of the Royal Horticultural 
Society, Lord Aberconway has world-wide prestige, but he is a 
notable figure apart from that fact. His estate is one of the 
finest in the British Isles, and his knowledge of plants is 
astonishing. Although Lord Aberconway visited all three of 
the big shows, he came to this country on the invitation of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and it was through this 
society that all the preliminary arrangements were made. It 
should be said in this connection that Mr. William H. Judd of 
the Arnold Arboretum, who is a personal friend of Lord 
Aberconway, made the original suggestion to his lordship, and 
much of the credit for this visit, the first official visit of the 
kind to be made in the history of any of the three societies, is 
due him. 

Lord Aberconway was much impressed with all the shows 
and expressed his surprise at the fact that salesmen with pen- 
cils and pads were not to be found at each exhibit. He said 
that that was the sort of thing which prevailed in England. 
That is one feature which we are not likely to adopt. 



72 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Another innovation came at the time of the Spring show, 
when a dinner for the members of the society was held in 
Horticultural Hall, the first dinner of the kind for fifty years. 
This dinner was so successful that it probably will be re- 
peated. It should prove to be one occasion in the year when 
the members of the society can get together for a social 
evening. 

This year's dinner offered an excellent opportunity for the 
presentation of the President's Cup, which was won at the 
show by Thomas Roland, Inc., of Nahant and was accepted by 
Robert H. Roland, whose exhibit of acacias added much to the 
beauty of the show. Another interesting event at the dinner 
was the presentation to Mr. Webster, as president of the soci- 
ety, of a medal from the Holland Bulb Exporters Association, 
this presentation being made by John Scheepers of New York. 
It was given for the Society's efforts in the promotion of inter- 
est in bulbs and bulb culture. 

The year has been rather uneventful as a whole, but there 
has been a constant increase in the number of members in 
spite of many losses from various sources, including 79 by 
death. The total membership on the first of May, 1936, was 
8,600, and 8,952 on the first of May of this year. The member- 
ship has hovered around the 9,000 mark for several months, 
and the secretary hopes that the total will reach 9,500 by the 
end of this year. It seems apparent that the society can sustain 
a membership of about 10,000 with its present facilities and 
staff. 

As it is, however, there is a constant pressure for additional 
room, because of the desire on the part of various organiza- 
tions to use this building for lectures, classes and meetings. 
The Trustees have now voted to construct an additional room 
on the third floor, and this room will be available within a few 
months. It is expected that the elevator will also be extended 
to the third floor. 

The large amount of equipment required for the exhibitions 
makes it necessary to have extensive storage facilities. Those 
originally planned have been outgrown, and many changes 
have been made in what are commonly called the catacombs, 
meaning the cellar space under the Massachusetts Avenue side 
of the building. The removal of many pipes, the cutting away 
of one wall and the lowering of the freight elevator has made it 



74 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

possible to store many tons of rocks and large amounts of peat 
moss, as well as tables, horses and vases under the smaller 
Exhibition Hall. A well-equipped work and paint shop may 
also be found in this part of the building. These improve- 
ments will be shown with pleasure to members who are willing 
to duck their heads in order to reach the cellar through the 
very low apertures which the architects provided. There are 
many reasons to believe that those who designed this building 
never dreamed that the society would assume its present pro- 
portions or that the number of its activities would increase to 
such a point as to tax the building's capacity. 

Getting rid of the pigeons and starlings, thousands of 
which have infested the building in past years, was a problem 
which the building committee finally solved by having the 
various roosting places painted over with a substance too 
sticky to be comfortable, although this object was not obtained 
without a certain amount of newspaper notoriety. 

As usual, the society has co-operated with the state in put- 
ting on educational lectures — a series on landscape gardening 
and one on flower arrangement. As usual, too, the garden 
clubs have made the hall the center of their activities and vari- 
ous other organizations have held their meetings here. The 
Boston Mycological Club and the Herb Society of America 
now have headquarters on the third floor. 

Thousands of flowers have been sent to sick persons and 
shut-ins by the Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower 
Mission, the quarters of which are often heaped with flowers 
after a large funeral. Perhaps sufficient credit is not given to 
the women who come here on such occasions, pull down the 
formal pieces, take out the wires and make up the flowers into 
bouquets which look as though they had just come from the 
greenhouse. It is an art to make up a typical funeral piece ; it 
is almost as much of an art to take it apart. 

Late in the year, Thomas Roland, Inc., gave the Society a 
number of large palms and other plants, some of which were 
distributed to various institutions, while others were retained 
for use in this building. They are to be seen in the entrance 
hall, where they create a highly decorative effect. 

An important vote of the Trustees late in the year was to 
the effect that first-class certificates shall be given only to 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 75 

plants which have already received an award of merit. This is 
a matter which judges will need to keep in mind at future 
shows. 

Another important vote of the Trustees was one favoring 
the encouragement of wild-flower propagation by nurserymen 
and planning for awards to stimulate this work. It was felt 
that this was one of the best ways to aid in the preservation of 
wild plants in their native habitats. 

Edward I. Farrington, Secretary. 

Report of the Treasurer 

STATEMENT OF THE SOCIETY'S FINANCIAL CONDITION 

DECEMBER 31, 1936 

Assets 

Cash in banks and on hand $ 27,087.10 

Treasurer $23,195.71 

Bursar: In bank 2,469.00 

On hand 10.00 

Savings bank deposits 1,412.39 

$27,087.10 

Investments — Valued at cost 539,607.63 

Capital Assets 588,603.47 

Real estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and additions to building 24,982.36 

Library 46,580.47 

Furniture and exhibition ware 9,808.21 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society History . . 6,140.38 
Lantern slides 2,527.42 

$588,603.47 
Deferred Charges : Spring Show 1937 4,295.83 

$1,159,594.03 
Liabilities and Capital Funds 

Liabilities Accounts Payable $ 19.92 

Sundry Funds 444,180.41 

Special- uses : Principal $156,913.73 

Unexpended income 8,723.38 

$165,637.11 

General uses : Principal 278,543.30 

$444,180.41 



76 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Prizes not distributed $ 38.00 

Life membership fees 21,894.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 51,163.47 

Library Cataloging Fund 1,000.00 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 46,789.57 

Balance, January 1, 1936 $43,053.45 

Add : Gain on sales of securities 3,736.12 

$46,789.57 

Surplus (Earned) $29,983.96 

Balance, January 1, 1936 $37,624.75 

Add : Received on 1935 shows and lectures .... 63.88 



$37,688.63 



Deduct : 

To show fund principal $3,000.00 

To library cataloging fund 1,000.00 

To furniture and exhibition ware . 700.00 

To special repairs 2,932.09 

Excess of expenditures over income 72.58 



7,704.67 
$29,983.96 



$1,159,594.03 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

Year Ended Year Ended 

Income December 31, 1936 December 31, 1935 
Income from investments and 
bank interest (less proportion 

allocated to restricted funds) $26,515.37 $21,991.01 

Membership fees 15,453.00 15,031.00 

Rentals 3,902.42 4,860.20 

Spring Show: 1936 10,300.59 

1935 20,833.95 

Autumn Show: 1935 684.52 

Incidentals 171.18 137.72 

Sundry donations 100.00 153.00 

Lantern slides — income 53.50 72.20 

Transferred from Show Fund . 2,800.00 

$59,296.06 $63,763.60 

Add : Horticulture income 163.14 558.63 

$59,459.20 $64,322.23 



78 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Expenditure 
Operating Expenses: 

•Building expenses $17,717.09 $16,987.21 

Library appropriations .... 1,491.81 1,755.87 

Library expenses 4,729.22 4,055.12 

Office and general expense . . 29,406.06 28,555.10 

Misc. exhibition expense .... 3,776.49 4,134.70 

$57,120.67 ■ $55,488.00 

Awards and Lectures : 

Lectures $ 389.30 $ 54.91 

Medals and certificates 671.05 238.60 

Prizes in excess of funds . . . 1,350.76 

2,411.11 293.51 



$59,531.78 $55,781.51 
Excess of Expenditures Over Income — 

Transfer to Surplus Earned $72.58 

INVESTMENTS AT DECEMBER 31, 1936 

Bonds Rate Maturity Cost 

% Date Value 

$15,000 Alabama Power Company 5 1951 $14,999.73 

5,000 American European Securities Co 5 1958 5,000.00 

15,000 American Gas and Electric Co 5 2028 14.270.76 

20,000 American Telephone and Telegraph Co. . . . 5 1965 20,106.94 

15,000 Anaconda Copper Mining Co 4y 2 1950 14,943.75 

15,000 Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 4 1952 14,608.11 

15,000 Central Pacific Ry. Co. Through Short Line 4 1954 14,943.75 

15,000 Columbus Electric and Power Co 5 1954 14,700.00 

15,000 Commonwealth Subsidiary Corp 5V 2 1948 15,665.20 

15,000 Eastern Gas and Fuel Associates 4 1956 14,475.00 

15,000 Georgia Power Company 5 1967 14,550.00 

15,000 Houston Gulf Gas Co 6 1943 15,672.58 

10,000 International Match Co 5 1941 4,661.25 

15,000 Louisville and Nashville R. R 4 1940 16,151.86 

15,000 New York Power and Light Co 4V 2 1967 14,197.00 

5,000 North American Edison Co. "C" 5 1969 4,775.00 

15,000 North American Edison Co 5V 2 1963 12,789.84 

15,000 Oklahoma Natural Gas Conv. deb 5 1946 15,000.00 

15,000 Penn-Ohio Edison Co 6 1950 12,113.91 

14,000 Potomac Edison Co 5 1956 12,222.22 

20,000 Puget Sound Power and Light Co 5V 2 1949 17,445.00 

9,000 Pure Oil Co 4*4 1950 9,909.13 

15,000 Railway and Light Securities 11th Series . . 4^4 1955 15,000.00 

8,000 Shell Union Oil Corp 3y 2 1951 7,920.00 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 79 

15,000 Scoville Manufacturing Co 5% 1945 $15,525.00 

15,000 Shawinigan Water Power Co 4% 1968 14,775.00 

15,000 Union Pacific R. R. Co 4 1947 13,650.00 

10,000 Washington Water Power Co 5 1960 9,418.75 



Total $369,489.78 

Shares St0CKS 

50 American Can Co $ 5,650.91 

100 American Telephone and Telegraph Co 14,766.96 

100 American Tobacco "B" 10,200.23 

200 Buffalo, Niagara and Eastern Power Co. Pfd 4,150.00 

150 Commercial Credit Corp. 4%% Conv. Pfd ) 

26 Commercial Credit Corp. Common \ ' 

265 136 /eoo Electric Bond and Share Co ) 

2,192 General Electric Co. Common j ld > 489 - 83 

100 First National Bank of Boston 5,025.00 

30 Fisk Rubber Co. Pfd 8,011.82 

500 National Power and Light Co. $6 Pfd 50,750.00 

160 North American Co. $3 Pfd 6,871.50 

100 Northern States Power Co. 7% Pfd 7,548.75 

365 a /o Radio Corporation of American Common 

400 Tampa Electric Co. Common 14,218.32 

200 United Fruit Co 12,660.00 



$170,117.85 
Summary 

Bonds $369,489.78 

Stocks 170,117.85 



Total $539,607.63 

SUNDRY FUNDS 
Income to be used for Special Purposes 

Unexpended 

Total Income Principal 

Samuel Appleton Fund $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

Josiah Bradley Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Albert Cameron Burrage— Library 34,289.13 $4,289.13 30,000.00 

Albert Cameron Burrage— Show 20,792.00 792.00 20,000.00 

Albert Cameron Burrage 1,438.87 188.87 1,250.00 

John C. Chaffin Fund 1,048.89 48.89 1,000.00 

William N. Craig Fund 2,523.40 23.40 2,500.00 

Benjamin H. Davis Fund 500.00 500.00 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Fund 3,412.86 185.86 3,227.00 



80 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

John S. Farlow Fund $ 2,512.18 $ 12.18 $ 2,500.00 

John S. Farlow Fund — Newton 

Horticultural Society 2,900.42 2,900.42 

Benjamin V. French Fund No. 1 500.00 500.00 

Benjamin V. French Fund No. 2 3,000.00 3,000.00 

John Allen French Fund 5,000.61 .61 5,000.00 

John D. Williams French Fund 11,693.65 11.77 11,681.88 

Henry A. Gane Memorial Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

H. H. Hunnewell Fund No. 1 793.00 293.00 500.00 

H. H. Hunnewell Fund No. 2 2,052.50 52.50 2,000.00 

H. H. Hunnewell Fund No. 3 1,500.00 1,500.00 

John A. Lowell Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Theodore Lyman Fund No. 1 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Theodore Lyman Fund No. 2 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Benjamin H. Pierce Fund 1,330.00 530.00 800.00 

Thomas Roland Fund 3,539.71 539.71 3,000.00 

John Lewis Russell Fund 1,380.98 380.98 1,000.00 

Show Fund 35,200.00 35,200.00 

William J. Walker Fund 2,354.89 .46 2,354.43 

Levi Whitcomb Fund 500.00 500.00 

George Robert White Fund 11,349.02 1,349.02 10,000.00 

Marshall P. Wilder Fund 1,025.00 25.00 1,000.00 

Total $165,637.11 $8,723.38 $156,913.73 

Income to be used for General Purposes 

Anonymous Funds $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

Albert Cameron Burrage Fund 1,200.00 1,200.00 

John Chaney Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Helen Collamore Fund 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Arthur F. Estabrook 49,100.00 49,100.00 

Ida F. Estabrook 11,238.76 11,238.76 

Caroline F. Freeman Fund 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Francis Brown Hayes Bequest 189,904.54 189,904.54 

Francis Brown Hayes Fund 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Margaret Whitney Fund 100.00 100.00 

Total $278,543.30 $278,543.30 

SPRING SHOWS, 1935 AND 1936 

Income < 1936 v. < 1935 * 

Tickets: 

Regular admission $39,747.25 $48,781.75 

Trade tickets 3,317.25 3,408.25 

Students' tickets 118.00 1,666.50 

Members' tickets 8,112.95 8,001.18 



The Botanical Backgrouis 

There is nothing more dramatic in economic evolution and horticulture than th 
of the human family and the development of gardens. Without the Angiosper\ 



Water 
Protoplasm #-► Plant Life 
Life 



Thallophytes (Sea weeds, etc.) about 80,000 s]i 
Bryophytes (Mosses, etc.) 16,000 

Pteridophytes (Ferns, etc.) 4,500 

Spermatophytes (Seed Plants) 

Gymnosperms 381 

Angiosperms 135,000 



Animal Life 



The Hunting Age 
(Food Gatherers) 

about 300,000 years ( 

^ m i. j.u t r i i Late Pre-agricultural Period 

Plants that are useful < 

harmiul 

useless 



Plants us« 



fishii 
Plants use 



Economic Botany and 



The product of observation, experiei 

1. Gums, Resins, Kinos, Caout 

2. Oils, fixed and volatile 

3. Dyes and Tanning Stuffs 

4. Foods 

5. Drugs (and Poisons) 

6. Fibres 

7. Timbers 

8. Ornamental Plants (Aesthel 






i Horticulture 

\ical prelude : the slow setting of the stage for the appearance 
lowering plants) human evolution would have been impossible. 



{Depending on external water 
for sexual reproduction 



Sexual reproduction not < Culminating structure, the Seed 



( dependent on external water 



food 

clothing 
shelter 
hunting, 
warfare 
medicine 
rnament 
nusement 



Culminating in the 

understanding of 

the seed and the 

discovery of its 

value in the 

production of crops 

ushering in 



The Horticultural and 

Agricultural Age 

(Food Producers) 

about 12,000 years 

culminating in 

civilization 



•ENING 



iff Ip tradition 

]i<*s» Gutta-Percha, etc. 



e ,l frdening) 



Prepared for the 

Horticultural Club of Boston 

by Oaken Ames 

January 8, 1986 

Reprinted by Perminsion 




Gladioli shown by Bancroft Winsorof New Bedford at the Gladiolus 

show in August 1936. Mr. Winsor's daughter, Sylvia, is 

widely known as a successful gladiolus breeder. 



82 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Garden Club tickets $6,274.00 $6,214.43 

Miscellaneous tickets 28.40 36.00 

$57,597.85 $68,108.11 

Programs 1,678.99 39.40 

Flower booth 3,630.15 661.86 

Checking 355.15 376.65 

Restaurant 1,104.53 1,294.22 

Trade space 9,642.70 8,620.31 

Wheel Chairs 91.90 129.85 

Peat and paper 498.74 657.12 

Plant material sold 52.00 

Miscellaneous 2.75 5.74 



Total $74,654.76 $79,893.26 

Expenditures 

Carting $ 66.25 $ 92.46 

Committee expense . . 219.05 184.20 

Committee fees 215.00 445.00 

Decorating 2,431.84 2,221.10 

Garden Club expenses 750.00 1,500.00 

Insurance 204.08 259.08 

Judges' expenses 718.29 400.17 

Labor 2,950.27 3,338.13 

Manager's salary 3,210.45 4,444.54 

Manager's expenses 98.92 78.49 

Music 385.00 230.00 

Plant material and forcing 1,396.25 1,539.22 

Police 400.00 600.00 

Postage, stationery, and supplies 926.36 1,222.16 

Printing 578.09 605.60 

Prizes 24,937.50 22,169.16 

Gardeners' awards 900.00 1,000.00 

Medals and certificates 661.66 730.14 

Publicity expense and commission 7,775.02 7,629.04 

Rentals 8,985.71 8,526.49 

Rubbish removal 360.00 530.00 

Telephone and telegraph 84.25 123.22 

Miscellaneous 1,090.87 1,015.51 

Flower booth expense 3,042.92 

Program expense 1,877.29 

Wheel chairs 89.10 175.60 

64,354.17 59,059.31 



Excess of Income over Expenditures — 

transferred to General Income $10,300.59 $20,833.95 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 83 

"HORTICULTURE" 

Year ended Year ended 

Income December 31, 1936 December 31, 193S 

Advertising $28,373.26 $31,263.32 

Subscriptions 19,660.85 19,447.01 

Books 111.26 233.27 

"Gardening in New England" . . 2,043.97 1,851.67 

Miscellaneous 2,268.54 1,895.62 

$52,457.88 $54,690.89 

Expenditure 

Printing $21,609.75 $21,657.62 

Paper 9,168.12 9,666.85 

Cuts 2,752.17 3,324.39 

Wrappers 524.88 504.12 

Postage 4,025.70 4,292.64 

Books 63.38 249.43 

"Gardening in New England" . . 1,304.39 1,589.41 

Commissions and discounts 4,720.05 4,545.29 

Contributions 1,368.80 1,843.18 

Salaries 4,000.00 3,966.63 

Miscellaneous 2,757.50 2,492.70 

52,294.74 54,132.26 

Net Income $163.14 $558.63 

BUILDING EXPENSE 

Year ended Year ended 

December December 

31, 1936 31, 1935 

Labor $10,526.50 $10,363.00 

Supplies 443.29 384.99 

Heating 1,420.79 1,496.55 

Lighting 1,698.87 1,626.50 

Telephone .60 

Repairs 1,278.94 1,899.46 

Insurance 1,923.35 816.75 

Incidentals 425.35 399.36 

Total $17,717.09 $16,987.21 

LIBRARY APPROPRIATION ACCOUNT 

Year ended Year ended 

December December 

31, 1936 31, 1935 

Printing $ 422.00 $ 31.83 

Binding and repairs 914.69 1,204.13 



84 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Books and periodicals $ 9.80 $146.99 

Supplies 135.85 168.14 

Postage 14.90 

Extra labor and salaries 188.38 

Incidentals 9.47 1.50 



Total $1,491.81 $1,755.87 

LIBRARY EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

Year ended Year ended 

December December 

31, 1936 31, 1935 

Salaries $4,549.24 $3,860.00 

Stationery and postage 91.48 97.17 

Supplies 40.60 4.65 

Printing 38.30 10.00 

Insurance 9.60 9.60 

Repairs 68.00 

Incidentals 5.70 



Total $4,729.22 $4,055.12 

OFFICE AND GENERAL EXPENSES 

Year ended Year ended 

December December 

31, 1936 31, 1935 

Salaries $15,163.20 $15,924.25 

Stationery and postage 2,980.06 2,522.47 

Printing 1,888.89 1,680.21 

Supplies 530.06 495.56 

Telephone and telegraph 723.22 628.82 

Traveling 432.28 162.09 

Subscriptions of members to Horticulture 6,403.32 6,057.47 

Incidentals 1,237.58 1,038.26 

Repairs 43.05 24.75 

Binding 4.40 21.22 



Total $29,406.06 $28,555.10 

MISCELLANEOUS EXHIBITION EXPENSE 

Year ended Year ended 

December December 

31, 1936 31, 1935 

Salary $2,062.98 $2,187.74 

Stationery and postage 40.26 

Printing 636.82 473.31 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 85 

Supplies $115.91 $124.98 

Advertising 125.00 50.00 

Exhibition committee fees 355.00 520.00 

Prize committee fees 95.00 165.00 

Judges' expense 8.45 46.88 

Traveling 231.02 344.66 

Incidentals 146.31 181.87 



Total $3,776.49 $4,134.70 

Report of the Committee on the Library 

The two outstanding features of 1936 were the participation 
of the Library in the Society booth at the Spring Flower Show 
and a marked change in the type of use made of the library 
by its visitors. 

For our first official appearance at the Spring Flower Show 
we arranged a small collection of new and useful garden books 
as a typical working library which proved attractive to 
passers-by and greatly aided the attendant in charge in 
answering their many and varied questions on gardening. 
The success of this venture in acquainting the public with the 
Society's library, its extensive resources and service has al- 
ready warranted repetition. 

The change in use of the Library itself the past year took 
the form of an increase in real study projects carried on by 
individuals for their own benefit. Months of intensive research 
among the sixteenth century books in the library, for instance, 
were necessary before the Old "World bee garden could be 
erected with such authentic charm at the 1936 Flower Show. 

The general reading has continued much as usual with a 
total circulation of 5,018 books. Although this is a slight drop 
from the 1935 figure, reports from all libraries indicate a 
similarly small, but general decrease in popular reading. 

At the end of 1936 the library possessed 24,696 bound vol- 
umes and a large number of unbound pamphlets. Four hun- 
dred and twenty-eight volumes were added during the year by 
gift or purchase. In accordance with our usual custom the 
Year Book includes a list of the gifts and their donors, but we 
would like to mention here our gratitude for both the books 
and the interest which prompted their presentation. 

A variety of exhibits in the show cases has attracted atten- 




A thatched roof shelter and Japanese symbols made an effective 

setting for chrysanthemums in the garden set up by Mrs. Francis 

B. Crowninshield at the Autumn show in 1936. 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 87 

tion. One of the most popular was a set of botanical charts by 
Miss Mabel P. Cook. It was rivalled in interest only by a col- 
lection of garden-club year books. Through the courtesy of one 
of our members, Mrs. W. S. H. Lothrop, we were able to show 
an interesting group of modern books on Japanese garden art. 

At the request of the officials of the New England Gladiolus 
Society and the American Orchid Society we were glad to 
arrange book displays during the gladiolus and orchid shows. 
All year the bulletin board has borne attractive and informa- 
tive arrangements of interesting pamphlets, jackets of new 
books, photographs by Miss Helen M. Murdoch, and various 
current items. 

Opportunities to work with other groups have been too 
numerous to describe here. I may mention, however, the invi- 
tation of the National Shade Tree Association to send a small 
collection of books useful to tree wardens and foresters to 
their conference at the Hotel Statler. The Massachusetts Asso- 
ciation for Occupational Therapy also asked us for the second 
time to contribute to their meeting a display of books helpful 
to their teachers. 

During the year a change in the personnel of the Library 
Committee itself has occurred, admitting Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby 
and Mr. Charles K. Cummings upon the retirement of Mrs. 
Bayard Thayer and Mr. John S. Ames. 

Nathaniel T. Kidder, Chairman. 

Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

At this time each year the Exhibition Committee makes a 
report on the flower shows of the year, and each year the 
chairman prepares his report in collaboration with his co- 
members for the purpose of recording the successes and fail- 
ures of the preceding twelve months period. This is the fourth 
successive year in which, as chairman of the Exhibition Com- 
mittee, I have come before you, and now, having retired from 
this office, I am going to depart from custom and begin, rather 
than end, my report by paying richly deserved tribute to those 
who have worked with me. 

Without the loyal support that I have received from the 
members of each successive Exhibition Committee over which 
I have presided, the four-year record would be, I am sure, 



88 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

a very different one. To Mr. Webster, our beloved president, 
and to Mr. Farrington, our ever-patient and able secretary, 
I offer my heartfelt thanks for all the time and all the good 
counsel that have been given whenever either was asked for. 
To Mr. Nehrling, our peerless show manager, I cannot do 
better than to say, "Well done, good and faithful servant," 
for since Mr. Nehrling came into the service of our Society, 
four years ago, he has more than measured up to the repu- 
tation he came with. He has built a new and lasting one on 
top of the old, just for good measure. 

When I became chairman in 1933, many problems con- 
fronted the Exhibition Committee. One great problem was 
whether flower shows could be put on without our having the 
support of all the private exhibitors who were the very back- 
bone of our flower shows from the Centennial up to the time 
when the depression became most acute. The answer was "Yes, 
we can put on flower shows because the public wants flower 
shows, and we will go out and get the support that we need 
from both the private and the commercial groups." 

It must be remembered that in the show business there is — 
shall I call it — a "battle-cry." The words of this battle-cry are, 
"The show must go on," and our shows have gone on. In these 
last four years, within our Society, we have step by step built 
up a flower show organization that has functioned more effec- 
tively each year since its beginning. As the burden of show 
management has increased, the strength of this show unit has 
been tested over and over again, and wherever weaknesses 
have shown up, they have been corrected as and when they 
have developed. I am calling these things to your attention, 
for you who are our members should realize more than you do 
that the Spring show alone has grown into a business proposi- 
tion of no little magnitude, and you must appreciate that in 
one short week, which is the duration of our Spring show, the 
judgments and the work of twelve to eighteen months are put 
to the severest kind of a test. 

Times and conditions are ever changing. These changes are 
today far more sudden than they used to be. Even in flower 
shows, styles reverse themselves. The public of today demands 
novelty and lots of color, and, therefore, in the exhibitions of 
this Society, these whims must be recognized, but at the same 
time the standards of horticulture, regardless of pressure 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 89 

from outside, must not be sacrificed. We must continue to 
uphold the highest standards of horticulture, not only in the 
matter of culture, but in arrangement as well. 

This brings us to the Spring show of 1937, and it must be 
said that your Exhibition Committee entered upon the under- 
taking of bringing Holland to Mechanics Building with many 
misgivings as to the reception such a spectacle would receive 
at the hands of our more learned garden club members and 
others. As an interesting experiment, as a spectacular feature 
for a Spring flower show, as a milestone in flower show history, 
this year's unified picture of Holland did not fail in its pur- 
pose. The public came. The public went away pleased, and the 
echoes are still pleasant to hear. 

I think that this year the garden club exhibits were dis- 
tinctly meritorious. I think, too, that the rose exhibits were 
probably the best that we have ever had at a Boston show. 
This year, for some reason, our orchid exhibits did not meas- 
ure up entirely to the standards that we have set in the past. 
In certain other ways our Spring show of this year could be 
criticized from a strictly horticultural standpoint, and the 
criticism would not be unfair. The 1937 Spring show, however, 
was a success. It will remain so in the records of the future. 

Looking back over the past year, our smaller exhibitions 
have been very interesting. Our June show was particularly 
worth while. We had a large number of exhibitors. The at- 
tendance was larger than in the previous year, and the quality 
of the plant material shown was outstanding. It is to be 
regretted that at our June show, roses seem to have fallen by 
the wayside, and because of this, a serious attempt should be 
made to arouse a new exhibition interest in roses among our 
members. I hope that you will all go forth from this meeting 
and spread this doctrine, for we need more and we need better 
roses at our June shows. 

Our mid-Summer and late Summer shows were held under 
the most trying weather conditions, and the attendance, as has 
been the case for several years, was disappointing. As these 
two shows have become highly specialized, the former in re- 
spect to gladiolus, and the latter in respect to dahlias, your 
committee has decided this coming year to turn our halls over 
to the New England Gladiolus Society and the New England 
Dahlia Society and allow these organizations to run these 



90 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Summer shows themselves. Your committee believes that this 
is a definitely progressive step to take at this time. 

In October of last year, as we were hosts to the American 
Orchid Society, we did not schedule our usual Autumn show 
of fruits, vegetables, and flowers, and so particular stress was 
laid on the late Autumn or chrysanthemum show. It proved 
to be one of the best late-season shows that we have held for 
some years. Over twenty thousand people came to our 
chrysanthemum show, and the quality of the exhibits proved 
to be outstanding. 

I have already commented on our Spring flower show of 
this year, and further comments, although possible, are unnec- 
essary. I am therefore going to bring this report to its close by 
recording another successful daffodil show held April 30 and 
May 1 in this very hall. We had an attendance of close to three 
thousand persons, and the exhibits were of high horticultural 
value. Our daffodil show, up to the present time, has been 
run on an informal basis without a printed schedule. Its 
success has been distinctly gratifying, and as a retiring chair- 
man, I hesitate a little in making the specific recommendation 
that it be made a regular scheduled show of the future. I am, 
however, willing to predict that it will become increasingly 
successful no matter how it is run, but once again let me plead 
for more exhibitors. 

The daffodil, especially in England, and now in this country, 
is enjoying tremendous popularity within a limited group. 
Each and every one of you can grow daffodils outdoors in 
your gardens with the greatest ease and the maximum amount 
of enjoyment to yourselves. There is almost no limit to the 
new forms and varieties that are being introduced, and there- 
fore our daffodil shows of the future can very well become an 
exhibition outlet for the many, rather than for the few, and 
future schedules can and will be ruled by the degree of enthu- 
siasm and by the intelligent demands that you, our potential 
future exhibitors, may make upon the Exhibition Committee 
as your interest grows. 

In closing, the success of our informal daffodil shows of the 
past three years suggests the thought that May is the month 
in which a very successful type of flower show could be run, 
combining tulips and rock gardens. At no time of the year are 
rock gardens better than in the month of May, and being an 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 91 

educational institution striving always for greater and greater 
horticultural achievement, we might find new fields to conquer 
by teaching the art of rock gardening and disproving the sub- 
urbanite belief that rock gardens are merely rock piles, in 
which almost any and every type of plant material may be 
used. With this profound observation, and again with heart- 
felt thanks to each and all who have worked with me in these 
past four enjoyable years, I bring this, my last report as 

chairman, to its end. TT ~ -^ ril . 

Harold S. Ross, Chairman. 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 

The work of the Prize Committee has gone on rather better 
this year. The system of choosing groups representative of 
various branches of judging has proved itself increasingly 
successful. Our card catalogue, which lists some of the best 
judges in the country, has been added to. We need to list a 
great many as we try not to use the same persons two years 
in succession. 

Impartiality both of the judges and Prize Committee as 
well is our aim and this is of greatest importance. 

Our new prize committee room at Mechanics Building, 
where the judges congregate before and after the judging and 
where a buffet luncheon is served, proved a great success this 
year and filled a much-needed want. 

We have realized the necessity of speeding up the judging, 
as an early posting of decisions is of utmost importance to the 
exhibitors. This year showed marked improvement in this re- 
spect and everything points to even better results the coming 

William Ellery, Chairman, 

Report of the Committee on Lectures and Publications 

This committee has little of importance to report except 
progress. The circulation of Horticulture has increased stead- 
ily, and with but little effort apart from the sending out of 
sample copies and subscription letters. The total subscription 
is now about 28,000. 

The financial standing of the paper is handicapped by the 
fact that a two-cent stamp must be affixed to every copy which 
is mailed within the Boston postal district. As a large propor- 



92 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

tion of our members live within this radius, the bill for post- 
age is very high. In point of fact, it costs fifty cents a year to 
send Horticulture to each member of the society. It costs much 
less to send the paper to our subscribers in Pennsylvania and 
New York than to those in Boston itself. That is one of the 
peculiarities of Uncle Sam's postal system. 

In the matter of lectures, the committee has maintained its 
policy of engaging speakers of ability whenever the occasion 
offered rather than preparing a set lecture schedule in ad- 
vance. Probably the most notable lecture given the past season 
has been that of Miss Margaret Preininger of Los Angeles, 
Calif., who lectured on "Japanese Flower Arrangement." A 
course of six lectures conducted by Mrs. Julia A. Latimer of 
Mamaroneck, N. Y., was well attended. This was the second 
course Mrs. Latimer has given here. It was a privilege to have 
Dr. Elmer D. Merrill, head of Harvard's horticultural insti- 
tutions, as a speaker. His topic was "Origins of Cultivated 
Plants in Relation to the Origins of Civilization. ,, 

Other lectures included Mrs. Preston Rice of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., and Norman Taylor of New York. Mr. C. Edward 
Newell, president of the Massachusetts School of Art, gave two 
lectures on flower arrangement, as well as conducting a course 
under the auspices of the State Department of Education. 

Monthly lectures and exhibits have been carried through 
the Winter in co-operation with the Gardeners' and Florists' 
Club of Boston, and the last lecture, that given by Mr. E. K. 
Walrath of Springfield, who had not previously spoken in this 
hall, was particularly valuable. The other speakers at the 
monthly meetings were Dr. Donald Wyman of the Arnold 
Arboretum, William Doran of the Massachusetts State College 
and George Graves of the Waltham Field Station. 

Winthrop Carter, Chairman. 

Report of the Committee on the Exhibition of the 
Products of Children's Gardens 

The Exhibition of the Products of Children's Gardens was 
shown in Horticultural Hall on the twenty-seventh and 
twenty-eighth of August, with an excellent display of flowers 
and vegetables. The exhibit which attracted most interest was 
one which completely filled the small hall with adequately 



ANNUAL MEETING, 1937 93 

labeled wild flowers which many persons might class as weeds. 
Chester Parker of Jamaica Plain showed 384 specimens. Helen 
Zinkosky had gone out from Leverett Street, Boston, to 
Jamaica Pond and Professor C. S. Sargent's old place and had 
gathered 250 varieties. Josephine Geabetti had enjoyed a visit 
to the Women's Municipal League Gardens in Woburn and 
there had gathered 150 flowers, which she had brought home 
and labeled. 

So great was the interest in these wild flowers that Mr. 
Dooley suggested a test like an old-fashioned spelling-bee be 
given to the children to make sure of their knowledge of what 
they were showing. If it were well done, it would add to the 
fun of the children. 

The exhibits of the 4-H clubs filled the Lecture Hall. 
Pauline Koch of East Lexington showed 184 specimens of 
beetles and butterflies which she had collected. Frances Clark 
had an interesting book of pressed weeds and flowers neatly 
mounted in a book of knotted pine covers. 

It was a good exhibition, yet I missed the special features 
such as Mrs. Tudor's garden in old Boston with the dolls 
watering the flowers, the Cape Cod Cottage shown two years 
ago, and the American desert once shown by Gertrude Sinnett. 
Such features are interesting and tax the ingenuity of the 
boys and girls. Let us encourage the exhibitors to show more 
of them. 

Marian Eoby Case, Chairman. 



The Result of the Balloting 

The polls were closed at 4 p.m., 577 votes having been cast, 
and the following were declared elected : 

President, Edwin S. Webster 
Vice-President, Oakes Ames 
Trustees, George W. Butterworth 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby 

Walter Hunnewell 

Robert H. Roland 

Robert G. Stone 




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Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society 



HONORARY MEMBER 

1900 Dr. Henry S. Pritchett, New York. 



CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 

1925 D. M. Andrews, Boulder, Colorado. 

1925 Rudolph D. Anstead, Bournemouth, England. 

1921 J. F. Bailey, Director of the Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, South 

Australia. 
1889 Dr. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca, New York. 

1925 F. R. S. Balfour, F.L.S., Dawyck, Stobo, Tweeddale, Scotland. 
1911 W. J. Bean, 2, Mortlake Road, Kew, England. 
1918 Desire Bois, Paris, France. 
1925 I. H. Burkill, F.L.S., care the Royal Gardens, Kew, England. 

1922 Joseph Edgar Chamberlin, Boston, Mass. 

1921 Fred J. Chittenden, F.L.S., Royal Horticultural Society, 

Vincent Square, Westminster, London, England. 
1925 Woon Young Chun, Sun Yatsen University, Canton, China. 
1925 Henri Correvon, Geneva, Switzerland. 
1925 G. W. Darnell- Smith, Director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, 

Sydney, New South Wales. 
1925 Henry F. duPont, Winterthur, Delaware. 
1925 Pierre S. duPont, Wilmington, Delaware. 
1925 I. B. Pole Evans, C.M.G., Chief of Division and Director 

Botanical Survey, Pretoria, South Africa. 
1925 G. Fraser, Ucluelet, Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 
1925 W. G. Freeman, B.S.C., F.L.S., Imperial Institute, South 

Kensington, London S. W. 7, England. 
1900 Beverly T. Galloway, Department of Agriculture, Washington, 

D. C. 
1918 Professor N. E. Hansen, Brookings, South Dakota. 
1911 Professor U. P. Hedrick, Geneva, New York. 
1925 Sir Arthur W. Hill, K.C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., Royal Botanic 

Gardens, Kew, Surrey, London, England. 
1925 Professor H. H. Hu, Fan Memorial Institute of Biology, Peking, 

China. 
1925 Mrs. C. L. Hutchinson, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. 

95 



96 MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

1925 Charles W. Knight, Oakdale, New York. 

1921 C. E. Lane-Poole, Canberra, Australia. 

1925 C. C. Laney, Rochester, New York. 

1911 M. Emile Lemoine, Nancy, France. 

1925 Donald MacGregor, care Royal Gardens, Kew, England. 

1925 Sir John S. Maxwell, Bart., K.T., Pollok House, near Glasgow, 

Scotland. 
1925 The Rt. Hon. Sir Herbert E. Maxwell, Bart., K.T., F.R.S., 

D.C.L., Monreith, Wigtownshire, Scotland. 
1918 J. Horace McFarland, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
1925 John McLaren, San Francisco, California. 
1925 Mrs. William Mercer, Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 
1925 Dr. Kingo Miyabe, Imperial University, Sapparo, Japan. 
1898 Sir Frederick W. Moore, F.L.S., Willbrook House, 

Rathfarnham, Co. Dublin, Ireland. 
1918 Dr. George T. Moore, Botanical Gardens, St. Louis, Missouri. 
1925 F. Cleveland Morgan, Montreal, Canada. 
1925 M. L. Parde, Nogent-sur-Vernisson (Loiret), France. 
1906 Lt.-Col. Sir David Prain, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., Warlingham, 

Surrey, England. 
1925 Miss Isabella Preston, Ottawa, Canada. 
1925 Johannes Rafn, Skovfrokontoret, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
1906 Dr. Henry L. Ridley, C.M.G., F.R.S., F.L.S., Kew, Surrey, 

England. 
1921 L. Rodway, C.M.G., Government Botanist and Secretary, Botanic 

Gardens, Hobart, Tasmania. 
1925 Camillo Schneider, Gartenschonheit, Berlin-Westend, 

Germany. 
1925 F. L. Skinner, Dropmore, Manitoba. 
1925 Professor Sir William Wright Smith, F.L.S., Royal Botanic 

Gardens, Edinburgh, Scotland. 
1 893 Professor William Trelease, Urbana, Illinois. 

1918 F. Gomer Waterer, Knaphill, Surrey, England. 

1925 Cyril T. White, Government Botanist, Brisbane, Queensland, 
Australia. 

1919 J. C. Williams, Gorran, Cornwall, England. 

1921 Gurney Wilson, Secretary Royal Horticultural Society Orchid 

Committee, Vincent Square, London S. W. 1, England. 
1925 John C. Wister, Germantown, Pennsylvania, 
1925 Major A. C. T. Woodward, Bewdley, Worcestershire, England. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1936 



Abbot, Mrs. John R., Cambridge 
Abbott, Miss Bertha J., Dorchester 
Abbott, Mr. S. L., Jr., Pomfret, Conn. 
Aberdein, Mrs James D., Brookline 
Adams, Miss Clara A., Dorchester 
Adams, Mrs. H. M., Brookline 
Adams, Miss Louise, South Boston 
Akmentin, Mr. James, Wellesley 
Alden, Miss Anne M., Brookline 
Alden, Mrs. Frederick L., East Wey- 
mouth 
Alden, Mrs. Horatio, Brookline 
Aldrich, Mrs. Bailey, Boston 
Aldrich, Mrs. Max L., Fitchburg 
Alexander, Mrs. D. C, Roslindale 
Alexander, Mrs. Lena R., East Lynn 
Alexander, Miss Mabel W., Boston 
Alfaro, Mrs. Victor R., Washington, 

D. C. 
Allen, Mrs. Cecil B., Chestnut Hill 
Allen, Mr. George M., Boston 
Allen, Mr. Leslie H., Newton Highlands 
Allen, Mrs. W. Stuart, Concord 
Alley, Mrs. H., Hyde Park 
Alsen, Mr. Carl W., Jr., Arlington 
Amann, Mrs. Walter A., West Roxbury 
Ambrose, Mr. Kazimer J., Weymouth 
Ames, Mrs. John L., Boston 
Amory, Mrs. Harold, Dover 
Andrews, Mr. Bernard R., Braintree 
Andrews, Mr. Harry M., Milton 
Andrews, Mr. Lawrence, Groton 
Annis, Mr. James, Barrington, R. I. 
Annis, Mr. Lyndon W., Maiden 
Anthony, Mr. Henry A., Concord, N. H. 
Appleby, Mrs. John T., Newton Centre 
*Appleton, Miss Nathalie, Brookline 
Archambult, Mr. Maurille L., Fall River 
Arms, Mrs. C. S., Worcester 
Arnold, Mr. Fred S., Jamaica Plain 
Arnold, Mr. Joseph A., West Peru, Me. 
Arthur, Mrs. Harold W., Somerville 
Atkins, Mrs. N. H., Belmont 
Ault, Mrs. Warren O., Waban 
Austin, Dr. O. L., Wellfleet 
Babcock, Mr. Ralph G., Reading 
Backes, Mr. William J., Bedford 
Bacon, Mrs. Robert E., Harwichport 
Badger, Miss Catherine H., Portsmouth, 

N. H. 
Badger, Mr. William L., Lynn 
Bagg, Miss Shirley, West Springfield 
Bailey, Mrs. David W., Cambridge 
Baker, Mr. Louis F., Brookline 
Balch, Mrs. F. G., Jr., Newton Centre 
Balcom, Miss Helen B., Boston 
Baldwin, Mrs. Harold P., Naugatuck, 

Conn. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Henry Skinner, 

Jacksonville, Fla. 
Baldwin, Mrs. James N., Chestnut Hill 
Baldwin, Mrs. Roger J., Canton 



Ball, Mr. George J., West Chicago, 111. 
Ball, Mr. John D., Islington 
Ball, Mr. Willard J., Newton Upper Falls 
Ballantyne, Mrs. J., Sharon 
Balzer, Mr. Walter W., Spokane, Wash. 
Bangs, Mrs. H. S., Boston 
Banks, Mrs. Lewis, Marlboro 
*Barnard, Mrs. George E., Ipswich 
Barnes, Mr. Jacob Dodge, Wenham 
Barnicoat, Mr. J. T., Shawomet, R. I. 
Barrett, Mr. Lea E., Wollaston 
Barrie, Mrs. James R., Reading 
Bartlett, Mrs. Stephen R., South 

Hingham 
Bartow, Mrs. H. K., Jr., Hingham 
Barwood, Mrs. L. J., Cambridge 
Batchelder, Mrs. Charles F., Jr., Milton 
Bates, Mrs. Oric, Groton 
Bath, Miss Eva M., Boston 
Baxter, Mrs. Beatrice Brown, West 

Bridgewater 
Baylor, Mrs. Sidney H., Auburndale 
Bearse, Mrs. H. L., Brookline 
Beck, Mrs. E. F., Needham 
Becker, Mrs. G. W., Swampscott 
Beckler, Miss Edith A., Cambridge 
Beebe, Mrs. Herbert L., Boston 
Belknap, Mrs. Francis W., Marblehead 

Neck 
Belknap, Mrs. Harry, Boston 
Bell, Miss Elizabeth, Wellesley Hills 
Bell, Mrs. William, Wellesley Hills 
Bemis, Mrs. George, Milton 
Bennett, Mr. Harry H., Salem 
Bent, Mr. A. Cleveland, Taunton 
Bentley, Miss Elizabeth, Hyde Park 
Benton, Mrs. Jay R., Belmont 
Berry, Mrs. Charles F., Arlington 
Berry, Mrs. James M., Maiden 
Bickford, Miss Mary M., Hanover 
Biddle, Mrs. 0. P., Cambridge 
Biddlecome, Miss Elizabeth, Boston 
Bilbruck, Mr. James D., Kittery, Maine 
Bill, Mrs. Carl A., Marlboro 
Bills, Miss Dorothy J., Waltham 
Bishop, Miss Emily F., Chelmsford 
Bishop, Mr. Ernest H., Jr., Quincy 
Bissett, Miss Isabella L., Dorchester 
Bistline, Mrs. Una, Dover, N. H. 
Bitter, Mrs. Francis, Cambridge 
Black, Mrs. N. Henry, Cambridge 
Black, Mrs. Walter Hyde, Jamaica Plain 
Blackfan, Mrs. Kenneth D., Chestnut 

Hill 
Blackman, Mrs. A. W., Cambridge 
Blackmer, Mrs. H. Kerr, Brookline 
Blair, Mr. Lyman, Greenville, Maine 
Blake, Mrs. Charles H., Cambridge 
Blake, Mr. Charles M., Lexington 
Blake, Mrs. Hallie C, Lexington 
Blake, Dr. John P., Boston 
Blakely, Mrs. David N., Brookline 



*Life Members. 



98 



NEW MEMBERS, 1936 



99 



Bleakney, Mrs. Guy, Cambridge 
Blossom, Mrs. Harold Hill, W. Roxbury 
Blumenthal, Mrs. P. R., Newton Centre 
Boardman, Mrs. Charles, Lynn 
Boardman, Mrs. Edwin A., Boston 
Bolles, Miss S. I., Commack, L. I., N. Y. 
Bond, Mrs. Robert J., Acton 
Booth, Miss Elizabeth McP., Cambridge 
Bordeaux, Mr. Louis J., Springfield 
Borst, Mr. Theodore P., Pramingham 

Centre 
Botsford, Miss Mary R., Williamstown 
Boulter, Mrs. L. S., Roxbury 
Boutwell, Mrs. H. R., Wilmington 
Bowers, Mrs. Charles P., Concord 
Bowers, Mrs. William, Cambridge 
Bowman, Mrs. R. H., Belmont 
Boyd, Miss Constance D., Jamaica Plain 
Boynton, Mrs. Charles W., Melrose 

Highlands 
Bradley, Mr. Henry G., Brookline 
Bradley, Mrs. Henry G., Brookline 
Bradner, Mrs. John, Roxbury 
Bragdon, Dr. Charles J., Gardiner, Me. 
Bragger, Mrs. James K., Chestnut Hill 
Branch, Mr. Herbert C, Milton 
Brandenburg, Mrs. Pred, Braintree 
Brayton, Mrs. David A., Little Compton, 

R. I. 
Breard, Mr. Walter L., Edgewood, R. I. 
Brennan, Mrs. Frederick, Beach Bluff 
Brett, Mr. Charles P., Brighton 
Brewster, Mrs. E. H., Brookline 
Brock, Mrs. R. Lillian, Brookline 
Brooks, Mrs. Eugene C, Winchester 
Brooks, Mrs. J. Edward, Milton 
Brooks, Mrs. Van Wyck, Westport, Conn. 
Brown, Miss Alice, Boston 
Brown, Miss Elizabeth L., Charlestown 
Brown, Dr. G. Percy, Barre 
Brown, Mrs. J. Frank, Cambridge 
Brown, Mrs. John, Jr., Auburndale 
Brown, Mrs. Nicholas, Newport, R. I. 
Browne, Mrs. Alex S., Boston 
Browne, Miss Margaret P., Boston 
Brownell, Mr. W. Dexter, Jr., East 

Providence, R. I. 
Browning, Mr. Harold W., Kingston, 

R. I. 
Brownville, Rev. Gordon C, Newton 

Centre 
Bruce, Mrs. Robert E., Newtonville 
Bruggemann, Mrs. Lester G., Hingham 
Bruinsma, Mr. Sietse, Hanover 
Brunning, Mr. Alfred, West Roxbury 
Bryant, Mrs. John, Brookline 
Buck, Mrs. B. J,, Hartford, Conn. 
Buck, Mrs. Waldo E., Worcester 
Buckland, Mrs. Ethel A., Glastonbury, 

Conn. 
Buckley, Mr. William E., Manchester 

Green, Conn. 
Buckner, Mrs. Edmund G., Wilmington, 

Delaware 



Bugbee, Mr. Charles P., Dorchester 

Centre 
Bunnell, Mrs. W. Brewster, Hingham 
Burgess, Miss Mary E., Dorchester 

Centre 
Burke, Mr. Martin, Brookline 
Burley, Mrs. Harry B., Chestnut Hill 
Burnham, Mrs. H. A., Boston 
Burns, Mrs. John, Jr., Boston 
Burrell, Mrs. Harold, Atlantic 
Burroughs, Mrs.. Robert P., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Burroughs, Mrs. Stanley, Belmont 
Bush, Mr. Edgar I., Jamaica Plain 
Butcher, Mrs. P. H., Lewiston, Maine 
Butler, Mr. Harold B., Bridgewater 
Butterworth, Mrs. Henry L., Worcester 
Byrne, Mr. James Edward, Somerville 
Cabot, Mrs. Edward C, Cambridge 
Cabot, Mrs. P., Boston 
Cabot, Mrs. Hugh, Jr., South Braintree 
Calder, Mrs. Malcolm T., Maiden 
Cameron, Mrs. Roderick A., Wilmington 
Campbell, Miss Annie M., Cambridge 
Campbell, Mrs. W. Lee, Brookline 
Campbell, Miss Winifred, Gardner 
Carlson, Mr. H. David, North Easton 
Carstein, Mrs. Hans L., Cambridge 
Carter, Miss Grace M., Chelsea 
Carter, Mrs. H. H., Keene, N. H. 
Carter, Mrs. Henry H., Brookline 
Carter, Mrs. Hubert Lazell, Newtonville 
Carty, Miss Sarah Agnes, Winter Hill 
Casey, Mrs. Lucy C, Dorchester 
Castle, Mr. Lewis, Cohasset 
Castle, Mrs. Mabel M., Cohasset 
Caverly, Mrs. Ellen D., Brookline 
Cedron, Mr. Don, Newton 
Chadbourne, Dr. Bailey, East Milton 
Chadwick, Mrs. Theodore, Dedham 
Chamberlain, Miss Florence B., 

Brookline 
Ohamberlin, Mrs. Carey J., Cambridge 
Chambers, Mr. George A., Maplewood, 

N.J. 
Chandler, Mrs. R. W., Worcester 
Chapin, Miss Mabel H., Brookline 
Chapman, Mr. Duncan G., South Lincoln 
Chase, Mrs. C. Thurston, Monterey 
Chase, Miss Florence A., Boston 
Chatfield, Mrs. Albert Hayden, 

Rockport, Maine 
Cheetham, Mrs. Charles L., Dedham 
Cheney, Mrs. Harriot B., East Sandwich 
Chick, Miss Marion F., Brookline 
Churbuck, Mrs. W. B., Pocasset 
Churchill, Mrs. Lucy E., East 

Bridgewater 
Chute, Miss Florence L., Dedham 
Ciampa, Mr. Oostantino F., Dorchester 
Claflin, Mrs. Thomas M., Brookline 
Clapp, Mr. John S., Cambridge 
Clapp, Miss Mary A., Swampscott 
Clapper, Mr. Orville O., West Newton 



100 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Clark, Miss Alice G., Lawrence 
Clark, Mrs. Frank W., Cambridge 
Clark, Miss Josephine K., Newton Centre 
Clark, Mrs. Robert J., Boston 
Clark, Mrs. Theodore, Milton 
Clarke, Mrs. Helena R. C, Fall River 
Cleveland, Mrs. Henry M., Boston 
Coffin, Mrs. William B., Brookline 
Cogger, Mr. Stanley T., Melrose 
Cogswell, Mrs. Amy Vale, Henniker, 

N. H. 
Cohan, Mrs. Abner, Chestnut Hill 
Cohen, Mr. Hyman J., Boston 
Cohen, Mr. Joseph P., Newton Centre 
Cole, Mrs. Guy W., Dedham 
Cole, Mrs. Harry F., Ipswich 
Collette, Mr. Forrest, New Orleans, La. 
Collier- Young, Mrs. C. M., Stoneham 
Collins, Mrs. Orvis K., Hingham 
Colvin, Mr. Earl A., Waban 
Conant, Miss Helen J., Danvers 
Conant, Mr. William, Brookline 
Conklin, Dr. George, Hawthorne, Wise. 
Conn, Mrs. Warren H., Newton Centre 
Connolly, Mrs. James T., Newburyport 
Conrad, Mrs. Reginald A., Whitman 
* Converse, Mrs. Myron F., Worcester 
Cook, Mr. Arthur E., Needham 
Cook, Mrs. Carl, Boston 
Cook, Miss Mary L., Cambridge 
Cook, Mrs. Walter M., South Acton 
Coolidge, Mrs. Louis A., Boston 
Cordingley, Mr. William R., Chestnut 

Hill 
*Cordner, Miss Caroline Parkman, 

Boston 
Cote, Mr. John J., Avon 
Cotta, Mr. William J., Noroton Heights, 

Conn. 
Coughlan, Miss Dorothy F., Dorchester 
Covington, Mrs. C. Leslie, Winthrop 
Cox, Mrs. Allen H., Cambridge 
Cox, Miss Charlotte, Holyoke 
Cox, Mrs. David E., Brockton 
Cox, Mrs. Kenyon, Mount Kisko, N. Y. 
Cox, Mr. Malcolm, Salem 
Crabtree, Mr. Edward, Brookline 
Creighton, Mrs. Gordon K., Brookline 
Crory, Mr. Roy L., Presque Isle, Maine 
Crosby, Miss Harriet F., Milford, N. H. 
Cross, Mrs. Grosvenor, Brookline 
Croswell, Miss Emily L., Boston 
Crowe, Miss Georgia, Wakefield 
Crowell, Mr. C. B., Middleboro 
Crowell, Mrs. Charles A., South Dennis 
Crowell, Mrs. H. H., Medford 
Crowell, Miss Jeannie F., Stoneham 
Crowell, Mrs. Winslow, Brookline 
Cryan, Mr. Henry, Swampscott 
Gumming, Miss Isabelle, Marion 
Cummings, Mrs. Francis H., Prides 

Crossing 



Cummings, Mr. S. Robert, Woburn 
Cunningham, Miss Hester, Milton 
Cunningham, Mr. Langdon, Beverly 
Cunningham, Mrs. Stanley, Milton 
Currie, Mrs. Harold Vincent, 

Auburndale 
Currier, Mrs. Donald E., Cambridge 
Curtin, Mr. Warren, Arlington 
Curtis, Mrs. Alfred, Sharon 
Cushing, Mrs. Philip S., Norwood 
Cushman, Mrs. T. A., Whitman 
Dakin, Mrs. Anna F., Cambridge 
Daland, Dr. Ernest M., Newton 
Daloz, Mrs. Albert R., Boston 
Daly, Miss Marie, Roxbury 
Dana, Miss Edith, Fairhaven 
Dangelmayer, Miss G. Viola, Waltham 
Danner, Mrs. Carl F., Waban 
Davenport, Dr. Lowrey F., Waltham 
Davenport, Miss S. Bertha, Westminster, 

Vermont 
Davis, Mrs. Charles, Chestnut Hill 
Davis, Mrs. Chester P., Arlington 
Davis, Dr. F. Edwin, Wayland 
Davis, Mr. Fred L., Amherst 
Davis, Miss Helen, Boston 
Davis, Mr. Henry W., Dorchester 
Davis, Miss Katherine E., West Medford 
Davis, Miss Lillian W., Cambridge 
Davis, Mr. Luther, Newton Centre 
Davis, Mrs. R. Chandler, Gloucester 
Davis, Mrs. Walter A., Brookline 
Davis, Mrs. Welbourn B., Newman, Ga. 
Day, Mrs. Frederic L., Cambridge 
Day, Miss Grace B., Brookline 
Dean, Mrs. Frederic S., Sheffield 
Dean, Miss May, East Gloucester 
Deeg, Mr. Fred H., Sharon 
Delehanty, Miss Josephine A., Belmont 
Demaris, Miss Olive, Cambridge 
Derby, Mrs. Henry Clarke, Cambridge 
Dervan, Mr. William J., Dorchester 
Devens, Mrs. Arthur L., Boston 
Dewar, Mr. Charles D., Dedham 
Dexter, Miss Myrtle T., Central Falls, 

R. I. 
Dick, Mr. George M., Jr., Allston 
Dieter, Miss Margaret, Boston 
Diman, Miss Elizabeth G., Holbrook 
Dolan, Mrs. Mary E., Dorchester 
Dolbeare, Miss Alice E., South Braintree 
Dolliver, Mr. W. R., Brighton 
Donoghue, Mrs. Francis, Boston 
Donovan, Miss Genevieve M., Meriden, 

Conn. 
Doolittle, Miss Maude, Brookline 
Dorr, Mrs. Nancy A., Boston 
Dorrance, Mrs. G. M., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Dow, Mrs. James K., North Andover 
*Downs, Miss Elizabeth S., Winchester 
Downs, Mrs. M. J., Brookline 
* Dowse, Miss Margaret, West Newton 



*Life Members. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1936 



101 



Dudley, Mrs. Sterling, Columbus, Ga. 
Duff, Miss May J., Boston 
Duffy, Mr. Charles L., Cambridge 
Duffy, Mr. J. Henry, Lexington 
Dugan, Miss Margaret H., Maiden 
Duguid, Miss Isabella M., Boston 
Duly, Mr. Stephen Richard, Beach Bluff 
Dummer, Mrs. Charles A., Brookline 
Dunbar, Miss Florence A., Canton 
Duncklee, Miss Helen L. ( Brookline 
Dunham, Miss Edna I., Salem 
Dunham, Miss Lillian M., Salem 
Dunlap, Mr. Joseph F., South Boston 
Dunn, Miss Edith A., Brookline 
Dunnell, Mrs. William W., Boston 
Duren, Mrs. Merle W., Reading 
Durfee, Miss Marian A., Arlington, R. I. 
Durkee, Mrs. Frank W., Tufts College 
Durlly, Mrs. William H., Chestnut Hill 
Dvilnsky, Mrs. L., Brookline 
D wight, Mrs. George E., Brookline 
Dwyer, Miss Mary T., Cambridge 
Dwyer, Mrs. T. F., Jr., Cambridge 
Eastman, Miss Lillian A., Boston 
Eastman, Miss Nettie V., Auburndale 
Eaton, Mrs. Charles A., Brookline 
Edmands, Mr. George A., Newtonville 
Edsall, Mrs. William S., Belmont 
Edson, Mrs. A. L., West Roxbury 
Edwards, Mrs. David F., Cambridge 
Edwards, Mrs. Hamilton P., Swampscott 
Ehrenfried, Mrs. Albert, Brookline 
Eichkern, Mr. Clayton B., Taunton 
Eidam, Carl H., M.D., Lawrence 
Elliott, Mrs. Edward P., Cambridge 
Elliott, Miss F., Cambridge 
Ellis, Mr. Harry B., Beverly 
Elwell, Mrs. Alcott F., Boston 
Emerson, Miss E. C, Cambridge 
Emerson, Mr. Ralf P., Salem 
Emerson, Dr. Robert L., Boston 
Emerson, Mrs. Sarah White, Salem 
Emerson, Mrs. Theodore W., Chelmsford 

Center 
Emery, Mrs. Forrest S., Wellesley Hills 
Emslie, Mr. William L., Winthrop, Me. 
Engley, Mrs. Hollis Burton, Martha's 

Vineyard 
English, Mrs. S. C, Brookline 
Enslin, Mrs. Kate V., Ashland 
Erickson, Mr. Arnold G., Quincy 
Ernst, Mr. Lorenz, Jamaica Plain 
Ervin, Mr. E. Kenneth, Watertown 
Evans, Mrs. Alice E., Cambridge 
Evans, Mr. Lanius Duane, Cambridge 
Fales, Mrs. Eva C, Attleboro 
Falvey, Mrs. Timothy J., Swampscott 
Farlow, Mr. Richard W., Weston 
Parquharson, Miss E. Mabel, Boston 
Fay, Miss Katherine, Brookline 
Fay, Mrs. Richard D., Cambridge 
Ferguson, Mrs. Louise K., Chestnut Hill 



Ferguson, Mrs. M. C, Brookline 
Fermier, Miss Helene E., Boston 
Fernstrom, Mrs. Karl D., Cambridge 
Field, Mr. W. Stanley, Weston 
Fine, Miss Anna R., Chestnut Hill 
Finkelstein, Miss Helen, Jamaica Plain 
Fischer, Mrs. Albert A., Jamaica Plain 
Fishelson, Mr. Max, Boston 
Fisher, Miss Alice E., Boston 
Fisher, Miss Sarah E., Cambridge 
Fisk, Mrs. Otis H., Framingham Centre 
Fiske, Mrs. David L., Grafton 
Fitz, Miss Susan L., Jamaica Plain 
Fitzgerald, Miss Mae G., Dorchester 
Fletcher, Mr. Lawrence B., Cohasset 
Flint, Mrs. Carleton P., Cambridge 
Flood, Mr. Frederick A., Brookline 
Flye, Mr. Allen M., Andover 
Foisie, Dr. Philip S., Milton 
Follett, Mr. Stephen, Quincy 
Fontaine, Mrs. John Eaton, Brookline 
Forbes, Miss Pauline, Milton 
Ford, Mrs. Ambrose C, Clifton Forge, 

Virginia 
Forrester, Mr. Roderick, Roxbury 
Foss, Mrs. Walter F., Norwood 
Foster, Mrs. Herbert, Windsor, Vermont 
Fowler, Miss Avis, Concord 
Fowler, Rev. Cuthbert, Cambridge 
Fowler, Mr. Louis F., Newtonville 
Fox, Miss Elizabeth E., Gorham, Maine 
Franklin, Miss Mary, Melrose 
Franks, Mrs. W. H., Plymouth 
Fraser, Mrs. Florence, Hopedale 
Frawley, Mrs. John F., Chestnut Hill 
Freden, Mr. Harold C, Brockton 
Fredey, Mrs. Charles F., Newton 
Freidson, Mr. Joseph, Brookline 
French, Miss Helen B., Nashua, N. H. 
Friedman, Mrs. N. H., Brookline 
Fritchie, Mr. Walter G., Belmont 
Frost, Mrs. Alan B., Concord 
Frylink, Mr. Adrian, Babylon, Long 

Island, N. Y. 
Fuller, Mrs. Carleton P., Westfield, N. J. 
Funk, Miss Ruth E., Brookline 
Furber, Mr. Alan W., Milton 
Gaertner, Mrs. Alexander, Jamaica 

Plain 
Gagnon, Dr. Solomon, Waltham 
Gamble, Mrs. James L., Brookline 
Gannett, Mrs. Thomas B., Milton 
* Gannett, Mrs. William W., Boston 
Gardiner, Mrs. William T., Boston 
Garey, Mr. Carl B., Portsmouth, R. I. 
Garland, Mr. Cornelius N., Brookline 
Gavin, Miss Hilda T., South Boston 
Gay, Mrs. Fred A., Newton 
Gay, Mr. George H., Southboro 
Gettemy, Mr. Charles F., Dorchester 
Ghiloni, Mr. Alfred R., Marlboro 
Gibbons, Mrs. Joseph F., Brookline 



*Life Members. 



102 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Gibbs, Mrs. Edward A., Westwood 
Gibbs, Mrs. William W., Staunton, Va. 
Giddings, Mrs. Albert, Watertown 
Gilbert, Mrs. Charles T., Milton 
Gilchrist, Mrs. A. H., Barnet, Vermont 
Gilman, Miss Dorothea, Boston 
Gilmore, Mrs. George L., Lexington 
Ginn, Mrs. M. P. G., Winchester 
Glacy, Mrs. G. F., Chestnut Hill 
Gleason, Mrs. Walter, Boston 
Glidden, Mr. Harlan, Beverly 
Glidden, Mrs. W. T„ Jr., West Newton 
Godfrey, Mrs. Frank H., Boston 
Godin, Mrs. Charles A., Springfield 
Godvin, Mr. Thomas J., West Roxbury 
Goodell, Mrs. Ethel B., Salem 
Goodnow, Miss Gladys B., Brookline 
Goodspeed, Mrs. George T., Boston 
Goodwin, Mrs. F. S., Brookline 
Goodwin, Miss Pearl E., Quincy 
Gosselin, Miss Rhea L., Haverhill 
Gowell, Mr. Frank Willis, Framingham 
Graddy, Mrs. W. Henry, Versailles, Ky. 
Graham, Mrs. John H., West Roxbury 
Graham, Miss Marion O., East Foxboro 
Grant, Miss B. Virginia, North 

Weymouth 
Grant, Miss Edith, Boston 
Graves, Mr. Charles H., Hudson 
Graves, Mr. George, Waltham 
Gray, Mrs. Philip L., South Brookville, 

Maine 
Gray, Mrs. Thomas J., Jr., Brookline 
Green, Mrs. Virginia T., Cambridge 
Greene, Mrs. Jerome D., Cambridge 
Greene, Miss Maude M., Warren, R. I. 
Greenlaw, Miss Henrietta A., Cambridge 
Greenslet, Mr. Ferris, Boston 
Gregg, Mrs. L. W., Westbrook, Conn. 
Griffin, Mrs. Ernest H., Annisquam 
Grout, Mr. Charles T., Bellows Falls, 

Vermont 
Grover, Mrs. C. M., Cambridge 
Grover, Miss Emma, Athol 
Grover, Mrs. Frances L., Boston 
Grover, Mrs. Sarah S., Dorchester 
Grzebieniowska, Miss Eulalia F., 

Cambridge 
Guild, Mrs. Edward M., Brookline 
Guild, Mrs. S. E., Jr., Boston 
Gurnett, Mrs. Daniel W., Kingston 
Gurney, Mr. Edwin D., Brookline 
Gustafson, Mrs. Albert G., Wollaston 
Guthermuth, Mr. C. H., Louisville, Ky. 
Guy, Mrs. James McFarland, Belmont 
Habern, Miss Frances P., Brighton 
Hackett, Mr. Peter, Northbridge 
Halbersleben, Mrs. David, Chestnut Hill 
Hale, Mrs. Edward R., Boston 
Halfpenny, Mr. Arthur, Newport, R. I. 
Hall, Mrs. Bernard L., Whitman 
Hall, Miss Marion, Whitman 
Hallowell, Mrs. Sara L., Cohasset 
Halper, Mr. Henry, Boston 



Halsey, Mrs. Fuller, Boston 
Ham, Miss Ethel, Newtonville 
Hamburger, Mr. Walter J., Brookline 
Handy, Mr. Clifton H., Cataumet 
Handy, Miss Rae E., Marblehead 
Hardy, Mrs. Clarence B., Wellesley Hills 
Hardy, Mr. Henry W., Everett 
Harrington, Mr. Edward N., West 

Newton 
Harris, Mrs. Walter Leslie, Salem 
Harrison, Mr. Albert A., Fall River 
Hart, Mrs. Charles J., Belmont 
Harwood, Mr. Willard L., Boston 
Hastings, Mrs. Lewis A., Worcester 
Hay, Mrs. William B., Cape Elizabeth, 

Maine 
Hayden, Mr. A. Francis, Boston 
Haydock, Mr. Robert, Hewlett, Long 

Island, N. Y. 
Heap, Mrs. Hargreaves, Jr., Braintree 
Heasley, Mrs. Hugh, Boston 
Heath, Miss Ethel J., Brookline 
Hebard, Mrs. Herbert L., Mattapan 
Heddinger, Mrs. Howell G., Brookline 
*Helburn, Mrs. Willard, Cambridge 
Helm, Mrs. Mackinley, Brookline 
Helsher, Miss Ruth E., Concord 
Henderson, Mrs. Francis F., Milton 
*Herrick, Miss Margaret F., Brookline 
Herri ck, Mr. Neal D., Boston 
Hersey, Miss Ada H., Roxbury 
Hickey, Mr. Frank, Chestnut Hill 
Hickey, Mrs. William J., Jr., Brookline 
Higgins, Mrs. Stephen W., Boston 
Higginson, Mrs. Thomas Wentworth, 

Cambridge 
Hill, Mrs. Clarence B., Boston 
Hill, Miss Clementine B., Boston 
Hill, Miss Ella, Boston 
Hill, Miss Marion, Brookline 
Hill, Mr. Woodman C, Dedham 
Hilliard, Mr. William L., Framingham 
Hinman, Mrs. George W., Newtonville 
Hinman, Mr. Stanley B., Pulaski, N. Y. 
Hird, Mrs. Frederic H., Brookline 
Hitchcock, Mrs. John, Wellesley Hills 
Hixson, Mr. M. E., Boston 
Hobbs, Mr. Franklin W., Boston 
Hobbs, Mrs. Franklin W., Boston 
Hochstrasser, Mr. George E., South 

Weymouth 
Hodgkins, Mr. N. W., Lynn 
Hogsett, Mrs. Edith F., Athol 
Hohnby, Mr. Edward, Manchester 
Holbrook, Mrs. Pinckney, Cambridge 
Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H., Boston 
Holden, Mrs. Elmer, Marlboro 
Holliday, Mrs. Guy H., Hingham 
Hollidge, Mr. C. Crawford, Milton 
Holmes, Mr. George W., Braintree 
Holt, Miss Annie F., Chestnut Hill 
Holt, Mrs. Madeline W., Williamstown 
Holtham, Mrs. William E., Hyde Park 
Hoi way, Mrs. T. E., East Sandwich 



NEW MEMBERS, 1936 



103 



Hood, Mrs. Arthur N., Chestnut Hill 
Hooker, Miss M. S., Brookline 
Hooper, Miss Blanche, Allston 
Hooper, Miss Lilian, Allston 
Hornor, Mrs. Albert A., Brookline 
Horton, Mr. E. R., North Attleboro 
Horton, Mrs. Ruth A., Canton 
Hosford, Mr. Charles J., Watertown 
Houghton, Mrs. H. W., Hingham 
Hovey, Mrs. Charles Fox, Boston 
Howard, Mrs. Eva Perry, Holliston 
Howden, Mr. Norman, West Newton 
Howe, Mrs. Benjamin S., Brookline 
Howe, Dr. H. L., Brookline 
Howes, Mrs. Henry, Boston 
Hoyt, Mrs. George D., Swampscott 
Hoyt, Mrs. Willis H., Walpole 
Hubbard, Mrs. Richard, Hamilton 
-Hubbard, Mrs. Willis A., Woburn 
rf Humpage, Mrs. Frederick R., North 

Wilbraham 
Hunter, Mrs. Harold W., West Roxbury 
Hunter, Mr. Harry G., East Corinth, 

Vermont 
Hunter, Mr. John Robert, Chestnut Hill 
Huntington, Mrs. Edward V., Cambridge 
Hutchings, Mr. J. Orin, Somerville 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Marion C, Hampton, 

N. H. 
Hyde, Mrs. Edward S., Manchester 
Irving, Mr. Wilbur C, Somerville 
Ives, Mrs. J. S., Salem 
Jackson, Miss Ethel, Boston 
Jackson, Mrs. R. E., Marblehead 
Jacobs, Miss Maud G., Dorchester 
Jacobucci, Mrs. R. R., West Quincy 
Jacques, Miss Laura G., M.D., Tilton 

N. H. 
Jarret, Mr. Lawrence, Woonsocket, R. I. 
Jaureguy, Mr. Anthony, Newton Centre 
Jenkins, Mrs. E. T., Auburndale 
Jenkinson, Miss Anstace E., Brookline 
Jennings, Mr. William J., South Natick 
Jiffords, Miss Alice, Franklin, N. H. 
Johns, Mr. J. 0., Haydenville 
Johnson, Miss Ada B., Dover, N. H. 
Johnson, Mrs. Alice E., Keene, N. H. 
Johnson, Mrs. George A., Chelsea 
Johnson, Mr. Irving Rydell, Boston 
Johnson, Mr. Richard V., Bethel, Conn. 
Johnson, Mr. Richard W., Salem 
Johnston, Mrs. Arthur R., Melrose 
Johnston, Miss Dorothy M., Providence, 

R. I. 
Jones, Mrs. Arthur M., Brookline 
Jordan, Mr. Fred D., Bangor, Maine 
Jordan, Mrs. T. Eugene, Greenwood 
Joslin, Mrs. Elliott P., Boston 
Kaffenburgh, Mrs. Walter A., New York, 

N. Y. 
Kane, Mr. Patrick J., Milton 
Kaplow, Mr. Morris, Dorchester 
Karmazine, Mrs. Edna, Chestnut Hill 
Kaufman, Mrs. M. R., Belmont 



Keener, Miss Hazel, Boston 
Keepers, Miss Katherine C, Newtonville 
Keirstead, Mr. Robert G., Andover 
Kelley, Mrs. Oliver G., Newton Centre 
Keniston, Mr. Davis B., Boston 
Kenly, Mrs. William K., Manchester 
Kennard, Miss Helen G., Cazenovia, N.Y. 
Kenney, Mrs. R. L., Auburndale 
Kent, Mrs. John B., Abington 
Kent, Mrs. Oliver H., Brookline, Mass. 
Keown, Mr. Arthur D., Jr., Wilkinsonville 
Kevorkian, Mrs. A., Newton Centre 
Keyes, Mrs. Clara S., Brookline 
Killian, Mrs. J. Rhyne, Wellesley Hills 
Kimball, Mrs. William N., Woonsocket, 

R. I. 
Kimber, Mrs. Wilfred, Monson 
King, Miss Abbie C, Peabody 
Kingsbury, Miss Edith M., Belmont 
Kingsbury, Mrs. Felicia D., Rowayton, 

Conn. 
Kirby, Mrs. Frank A., Whitman 
Kitching, Mrs. Edward J., Melrose 
Knight, Mr. E. Foster, Salem 
Knowlton, Miss Evelyn, South Essex 
Kraus, Mrs. Fredericka F., Princeton 
Kroog, Mr. Frederick Richard, Needham 
Kussmaul, Mr. Ernest F., Jamaica Plain 
Lacy, Mrs. Daniel G., Brookline 
Lake, Miss Ethel T., Fall River 
Lamb, Mrs. Walter R., Atlanta, Georgia 
Lang, Mr. John B., Saugus 
Langer, Mr. Arthur, Hyde Park 
Langley, Mr. Horace W., Natick 
Larcom, Mrs. Carl E., Beverly 
Larcom, Mrs. R. C, Dedham 
Larson, Mr. Algot W., Saugus 
Lathrop, Mrs. Fred H., Natick 
Law, Mrs. Hervey F., Auburndale 
Lawrence, Mrs. Charles H., Brookline 
Lawson, Mr. Eli B., Brockton 
Lawton, Mrs. Charlotte D., Boston 
Leadbetter, Mrs. G. W., Washington, 

D. C. 
Leavitt, Mrs. Alice D., South Bridgton, 

Maine 
Leavitt, Mr. Frederick A., Brookline 
Leeds, Mrs. Adolph, Brookline 
LeFevre, Mrs. Malcolm A., Milton 
Lemaire, Miss Margaret, Taunton 
Leman, Mr. J. Howard, Boston 
Lemmon, Mrs. H. A., Reno, Nevada 
Lewis, Miss Mildred, Belmont 
Lindsay, Miss Elsie M., Portland, Maine 
Lindsay, Mr. Thomas P., Southboro 
Lindstrom, Miss Ethel, Dedham 
Little, Mr. Henry F„ Camillus, N. Y. 
Livingston, Mr. L. G., Cambridge 
Livingstone, Miss Elizabeth, Winchester 
Lockwood, Mrs. Harold S., Belmont 
Lockwood, Mrs. Wilton, South Orleans 
Lord, Miss Alice W., Salem 
Lord, Mrs. George B., Portsmouth, N. H. 
Iiorenz, Mr. William E., Egypt 



104 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Loring, Mrs. Oliver L., Dorchester 
Lothrop, Miss Mary H., South Acton 
Low, Mr. Asa R., Sanford, Maine 
Lowe, Mrs. J. R., Manchester, Conn. 
Lummus, Mrs. Henry T., Swampscott 
Lundburg, Mr. Carl V., Marlboro 
Lybeck, Mr. R. F., Winchester 
Lynch, Miss Mary J., Roxbury 
MacFaden, Mrs. V. E., West Roxbury 
MacGregor, Mr. Robert B., Topsfield 
MacLean, Mrs. Eva, Saugus 
Magnuson, Mr. Karl G., Cambridge 
Magoon, Mr. J. Foss, West Warwick, 

R. I. 
Mahard, Mrs. Edwin P., Natick 
Maloney, Mrs. A. M., Newton Centre 
Mandigo, Mrs. Mabel B., Foxboro 
Manion, Mr. Brion J., Manchester 
Mann, Mr. G. Russell, Winchester 
Manning, Mrs. Robert L., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Marble, Mr. Lloyd E., Needham 
Marcy, Mrs. Elizabeth M., Quincy 
Marden, Miss Bertha L., Goffstown, 

N. H. 
Marek, Mrs. Leroy F., Lexington 
Marr, Miss Louise, Boston 
Marshall, Mr. Harry L., West Somerville 
Marson, Mrs. Philip, Chestnut Hill 
Marston, Mr. Harry, Newton Centre 
Martin, Mr. James A., Waltham 
Mason, Mrs. Ella E., West Newton 
Mason, Mrs. Frank H., Augusta, Maine 
Mason, Mr. Jesse H., Watertown 
Mathews, Mrs. F. A., Lowell 
Mathison, Mrs. William, Whitman 
Matthew, Mr. R., South Dartmouth 
May, Mrs. Walter, Brookline 
Maynard, Miss Florence, Waban 
Mayo, Miss Ruth E., East Weymouth 
McBride, Miss Lillian E., Jamaica Plain 
McCarthy, Mr. John M., Brookline 
McCarthy, Mrs. William W., Brookline 
McDonald, Mrs. F. C, Boston 
McDonough, Miss Susie B., Reading 
McGaughey, Mr. Robert, Cambridge 
McGaw, Mr. W. H., Cohasset 
Mclntyre, Mrs. Alfred, Boston 
Mclntyre, Mr. John E., Watertown 
McKean, Mr. Q. A. Shaw, Prides 

Crossing 
McKillop, Mrs. Archibald C, Chestnut 

Hill 
McLay, Mr. Raymond S., Cambridge 
McMahon, Miss Elizabeth J., Winthrop 
McNeil, Mr. Paul W., Arlington 
Mead, Mr. Charles Stanley, Melrose 
Meaney, Mr. John S., Brookline 
Meinecke, Rev. Paul W., Lowell 
Mellor, Mr. Manuel, Middleboro 
Menchin, Mrs. Lewis, Woburn 
Mendenhall, Mr. John T., Mattapan 
Menninger, Mr. C. F., Topeka, Kansas 
Menninger, Mr. Karl A., Topeka, Kansas 



Merrill, Mrs. Margaret, Wollaston 
Miles, Mrs. Henry S., Fairfield, Conn. 
Millar, Miss Myvanwi, Brighton 
Miller, Mrs. M. L., Laconia, N. H. 
Miller, Mrs. William D., Wakefield, R. I. 
Milton, Mrs. Robert C, Worcester 
Minton, Mrs. J. V., Dorchester 
Mintz, Dr. Samuel C, Brookline 
Mist, Mr. R. E., Brookline 
Mitchell, Miss Christine, Concord 
Mitchell, Mrs. Edith, Fairhaven 
Mitchell, Mr. Samuel S., Canton 
Mithen, Mrs. Delia, Everett 
Monnier, Mrs. Leon E., Chestnut Hill 
Monroe, Mr. Noel G., M.D., Boston 
Montgomery, Mrs. R. L., Simsbury, 

Conn. 
Mooney, Miss Mae T., Maiden 
Moore, Mrs. Eva E., Brockton 
Moore, Mrs. Hamilton A., West Roxbury 
Moore, Mrs. J. L., Rindge, N. H. 
Moore, Miss Lettie R., Cambridge 
Morgan, Mrs. Charles T., Wayland 
Morrill, Mr. F. Gordon, Cambridge 
Morrill, Mrs. W. C, Cambridge 
Morris, Miss Angela J., Boston 
Morrison, Dr. S. L., Brookline 
Morse, Mrs. Arthur, Weston 
Morse, Mr. Carleton D., Needham 
Morss, Mrs. Henry A., Boston 
Mortenson, Mr. Clemens, Cromwell, 

Conn. 
Moseley, Mr. John B., Needham 
Mosely, Mrs. Virginia S., Brookline 
Mott, Mrs. Josephine C, Rockland 
Mown, Mr. Hobart L., West Yarmouth 
Moynihan, Mr. Richard, Canton 
Munn, Mrs. James B., Cambridge 
Munroe, Mrs. George L., Assonet 
Murdoch, Miss Helen M., Boston 
Murfitt, Mrs. T. S., Hingham 
Murphy, Mr. Howard Haines, Boston 
Murphy, Mr. Richard D., Cambridge 
Nagle, Miss Alice F., Medford 
Neal, Mr. Harold B., Jamaica Plain 
Needham, Mr. Harold B., Lexington 
Neilson, Mrs. E. M., Wilmington 
Nevins, Mr. Bernard J., Swampscott 
Newell, Mr. Charles E., Winchester 
Newey, Mr. William H., North Cohasset 
Newhall, Miss Marion, Peabody 
Newhall, Mr. Milo A., Salem 
Newinger, Mr. Vann Orr, Waban 
Nichols, Mrs. Charles, Chelmsford 
Nickerson, Miss Edith R., Jamaica Plain 
Nolan, Miss Ellen N., Cambridge 
Norris, Mrs. Charles E.. Epping, N. H. 
Northrop, Miss Jessica, Norwood 
Norton, Mr. Walter F., Nashua, N. H. 
Nowell, Mr. Ames, Boston 
Nowell, Mrs. Howland, New Bedford 
Nowell, Mrs. Iris 0., Boston 
Nugent, Miss Margaret E., Stoughton 



NEW MEMBERS, 1936 



105 



Nye, Mrs. Mildred S„ Campello 
Oak, Mr. Charles S., Northampton 
O'Brien, Mrs. Edmond T., Hanover 
O'Doherty, Miss Elizabeth A., Brighton 
O'Doherty, Mr. John E., Stoneham 
O'Donnell, Mr. John William, South 

Weymouth 
Ogilvie, Mr. Arthur, Kankakee, Illinois 
Ohnesorge, Mrs. Walter H., West 

Medford 
O'Keefe, Mrs. Thomas J., Brookline 
Olson, Mrs. Edith, Stoneham 
O'Mahoney, Miss Nellie, Lawrence 
Orbeton, Mrs. Stewart, West Rockport, 

Maine 
Orr, Mrs. Clire M., Newtonville 
Orr, Mr. R. Clifford, Wayland 
Osgood, Mr. A. Neill, Chestnut Hill 
Otto, Mr. Victor G., Westboro 
Oveson, Mr. Raymond, Southboro 
Packard, Miss Alice M., Dorchester 
Packard, Mrs. Bertha N., Fairhaven 
Page, Mrs. William, Haverhill 
Paine, Miss Frances T., Brookline 
Palmer, Mr. Ezra W., Boston 
Palmer, Mr. J. R., Revere 
Paradise, Mrs.T. F., Short Beach, Conn. 
Parcher, Mrs. Emily Seaber, 

Auburndale 
Parke, Mrs. Hervey C, Amherst 
Parker, Mr. Clarence H., Jr., S'augus 
Parker, Miss Ethel A., Franklin 
Parker, Miss Helen W., Wellesley 
Parker, Mr. Henry S., Maiden 
Parker, Mr. Samuel D., Boston 
Parker, Mr. Thomas F., Maynard 
Parker, Mrs. Torrance, Belmont 
Parker, Mrs. Walter A., Brookline 
Parsons, Mrs. Edward D., Bass Rocks 
Parsons, Mrs. Ernest D., South Lincoln 
Parsons, Miss M. E., Cambridge 
Pascoe, Mr. Herbert, Chestnut Hill 
Patterson, Mrs. C. Campbell, Jr., Weston 
Patterson, Mrs. Walter A., Waltham 
Patton, Mrs. Robert J., Framingham 
Paull, Mr. John, New York, N. Y. 
Pear, Mr. William H., Cambridge 
Pearson, Mr. P. H., Lynn 
Pepper, Mrs. Benjamin W., Auburndale 
Perkins, Mrs. Charles H., Lakeport, 

N. H. 
Perkins, Mr. George W., Medford 
Perkins, Mrs. John Carroll, Boston 
Perkins, Miss Mattie 0. B., Dover, N. H. 
Perrin, Mrs. Grace, Boston 
Perrin, Mrs. Richard B., Wellesley Hills 
Perry, Mrs. F. Gardiner, Wellesley 
Perry, Mrs. Louis E., Pocasset 
Perry, Mr. Merrill A., Dartmouth 
Perry, Mrs. W. G., Keene, N. H. 
Peters, Mrs. W. I., *Boston 
Petersen, Miss Anna E., Cambridge 
Petersen, Mrs. H. W., Woburn 
Peterson, Mr. Charles J., Wakefield 



Petreikis, Mrs. Frances, Dorchester 
Pew, Mrs. William A., Salem 
Phelan, Mr. John K., West Medford 
Philbrick, Mr. William E., Winchester 
Phillips, Mrs. H. G., Hyannis 
Phillips, Miss Mary I., North Dartmouth 
Pieper, Mrs. Louis P., Newton Centre 
Pierce, Mr. Alfred L., Wallingford, 

Conn. 
Pierce, Mr. Forrest C, Stoneham 
Pierce, Mrs. Martha A., Chelsea 
Pingree, Mr. Daniel, Providence, R. I. 
Pingree, Mrs. Daniel, Providence, R. I. 
Pinkerton, Mr. Edward G., Dedham 
Pinkham, Mrs. Walter S., Wollaston 
Piatt, Mr. Albert T., Huntington 
Polvere, Mr. Donato, Sharon 
Pond, Mrs. Robert W., Arlington 
Poole, Miss E. May, Gloucester 
Poole, Mrs. Herbert S., Wellesley Hills 
Poole, Mrs. Willard H., Fall River 
Poor, Mrs. Benjamin P., Townsend 
Poore, Mr. Fred II., Portsmouth, N. H. 
Pope, Mrs. Kennedy, Dedham 
Porter, Miss Alice W., Weston 
Porter", Mrs. Ernest J., Peabody 
Porter, Miss Irene A., Everett 
Potter, Miss Bertha P., Foxboro 
Pousland, Miss Elizabeth C, Rockport 
Powell, Mr. Charles A., Brighton 
Powers, Mrs. H. H., Newton 
Powers, Miss Margaret L., Quincy 
Prather, Dr. George C, Wellesley Hills 
Prescott, Mr. E. Wentworth, Boston 
Prescott, Mrs. Oliver, Jr., Padanaram 
Prescott, Mrs. S. U., Lexington 
Prouse, Mrs. J. B., Newton 
Purcell, Mr. Stanley R., Squantum 
Quimby, Mr. M. J., Sharon 
Quinlan, Miss Katherine A., Natick 
Quint, Mr. William D., Boston 
Rabethge, Mr. Rudolph O., Winthrop 
Rafferty, Mr. M. E., West Roxbury 
Ransom, Miss Clara, Milton 
Rantoul, Mrs. L. B., Chestnut Hill 
Raphael, Mrs. Benjamin F., Brookline 
Raymond, Mrs. Howard C, Watertown 
Read, Miss Eleanor, Barre 
Read, Miss Mildred, Fall River 
Reed, Mr. Carroll P., Roslindale 
Reed, Mrs. Mabel S., Quincy 
Regamey, Mrs. Anthony, Woburn 
Regan, Mr. Martin J., Washington 

Depot, Conn. 
Rehm, Mrs. Clara G., Lake Geneva, 

Wisconsin 
Reid, Mrs. C. M., Sharon 
Reid, Miss Lilias, Boston 
Remick, Mrs. Ervin D., Brookline 
Remick, Mrs. James W., Winchester 
Rhodes, Miss Carroll, Andover 
Rice, Mr. Woodworth J., Millis 
Richards, Mrs. Grover 0., South 

Portland, Maine 



106 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Richardson, Mrs. Harold, Waban 
Richardson, Mrs. Sara L., Belmont 
Ricker, Mrs. Robert E., Needham 
Riesman, Mrs. Joseph G., Brookline 
Riordan, Miss Margaret E., Charlestown 
Robbins, Mrs. Harry C, Swampscott 
Robinson, Mr. Edwin D., Mansfield 
Robinson, Mr. Frederick, Pigeon Cove 
Robinson, Mrs. J. J., West Newton 
Rodman, Miss Caroline, LaFayette, R. I. 
Rogers, Mrs. Alice M., Quincy 
Rogers, Miss Elizabeth, Coronado, Calif. 
Rogers, Mr. George W., Melrose 
Rogers, Mrs. T. W., Swampscott 
Rogerson, Miss Martha, Milton 
Rolde, Mrs. Robert L., Brookline 
Rolland, Miss Sibyl E., Dedham 
Rosander, Mr. Conrad S., Woburn 
RoAve, Mrs. Helen C, Walpole 
Ruble, Dr. Wells Allen, Melrose 
Rudginsky, Mrs. Frances, Winthrop 
Rudnick, Mrs. I. H., Newton Highlands 
Rushton, Mr. Melvin H., Braintree 
Russell, Mrs. Otis T., Boston 
Russell, Mrs. Richard, Cambridge 
Russell, Mrs. Susan T., Cambridge 
Saari, Mr. Wilpas, Troy, N. H. 
Salinger, Mrs. Alex D., Newtonville 
*Sampson, Mrs. Mary M., Wellesley Hills 
Samson, Mr. Donald, Wellesley 
Sanborn, Mrs. Arnold, Dryden, Maine 
Sandahl, Mr. Paul L., Des Moines, Iowa 
Sanders, Mrs. Mildred, Dallas, Texas 
Sanders, Mr. W. W., Melrose 
Sargent, Mrs. William Denny, Salem 
Saul, Mr. Herbert Wallace, South 

Braintree 
Saunders, Mrs. Arthur L., Salem 
Saunier, Miss Rylla E., Ipswich 
Savage, Mrs. Ethel, Arlington 
Sawyer, Mrs. Alpha R., Chestnut Hill 
Sawyer, Mrs. G. E., Stoughton 
Schatz, Mrs. A., Dorchester 
Schenck, Mr. Frank, Newton Centre 
Schoenfield, Mrs. Henry S., Newton 

Centre 
Schofield, Mrs. Frederick, Beverly 
Scott, Mrs. Carleton W., Rockland 
Scott, Mrs. Sarah 0., Belmont 
Seaman, Mrs. John H., Fairhaven 
Sears, Mrs. Lewis, Milton 
Seaver, Miss Minnie S., Lexington 
Sedgwick, Mrs. W. Ellery, Cambridge 
Seegal, Mrs. S. M., Newton 
Seegel, Mrs. Samuel E., Brookline 
Seton, Mrs. Henry, Brookline 
Sewall, Mrs. James, Woburn 
Shafer, Miss Xoe M., Brookline 
Sharpies, Mrs. Phillip P., Cambridge 
Shattuck, Mrs. George, Brookline 
Shedd, Miss Minnie L., Arlington 
Sheehan, Mr. John A., Cambridge 



Shepley, Mrs. Henry R., Brookline 
Sherman, Mrs. Frank M, Jr., 

Dartmouth 
Sherwin, Mrs. George, Keene, N. H. 
Shrader, Mrs. Justin W., Waban 
Shurtleff, Miss Dorothy H., Boston 
Sibley, Mrs. A. R., Egypt 
Sibley, Mr. Clifton A., Beverly 
Simmons, Mr. Herbert, Bristol, Conn. 
Simonds, Mrs. L. C, Somerville 
Simons, Mrs. Benjamin, Brookline 
Sisson, Mrs. W. W., Pittsfield 
Smith, Miss Adrienne E., Auburndale 
* Smith, Miss Emily G., Concord 
Smith, Mr. Harold O., Lexington 
Smith, Mr. Harrison W., Tahiti Island 
Smith, Mrs. Jerome C, Boston 
Smith, Mrs. Manilla H., Auburn, Maine 
Smith, Mrs. R. E., Winchester 
Smith, Mrs. Willis E., Melrose 
Solomon, Dr. H. 0., Jamaica Plain 
Somersby, Mrs. J. Winifred, Winthrop 
Sonnabend, Mr. A. M., Brookline 
Soule, Mrs. George C, South Portland, 

Maine 
Sourian, Miss Alice A., Dorchester 
Spalding, Miss Grace M., East Gloucester 
Spaulding, Miss Marion I., Tamwarth, 

N. H. 
Spencer, Miss Jeanne F., Groton 
Spooner, Mr. James, Plymouth 
*Spruance, Miss Edith, Wilmington, 

Delaware 
Stacey, Dr. C. F., Boston 
Stackpole, Miss Alice, Boston 
Stackpole, Mrs. Markham W., Milton 
Standley, Mrs. Fred A., East Lynn 
Stanhope, Mrs. Robert, Auburndale 
Stanwood, Miss Marian H., Boston 
Stargardter, Mrs. Albert R., Chestnut 

Hill 
Stead, Mr. Frank, Maiden 
Stearns, Miss Marjorie, Danvers 
Stearns, Mrs. Philip Morris, Cohasset 
Stearns, Mrs. Phineas, Bedford 
Stegeman, Mr. William H., East Lynn 
Steinacker, Mr. W. E., West Newton 
Stephenson, Mrs. A. F., S'outhbridge 
Stevens, Mrs. Abbot, North Andover 
Stevens, Mrs. Bessie, Lynn 
Stevens, Mr. Warren, Needham 
Stevens, Mrs. Wesley, Everett 
Stickney, Mrs. Ethel M., Beverly 
Stillman, Mr. Carl S., Wellesley 
Stoddard, Mrs. H. G., Gloucester 
Stokes, Mrs. LeRoy T., Haverhill 
Stone, Miss Katharine H., West Medford 
Stratton, Mr. Charles, Reading 
Street, Mr. Harold J. A., Dedham 
Strom, Mr. Elias, Roxbury 
Strout, Mr. Vernon L., Waltham 
Sullivan, Mrs. James A., Prides Crossing 



*Life Members. 



NEW MEMBERS, 1936 



107 



Sullivan, Mr. Timothy, Boston 
Sumner, Mrs. Clara G., Cambridge 
Sunderman, Miss Nellie E., Springfield 
Swain, Mr. William D., Wellesley Hills 
Swanson, Mr. T. P., Providence, R. I. 
Swift, Mrs. Francis W., East Weymouth 
Swift, Miss Harriett, West Roxbury 
Taber, Mrs. Chester L., Whitman 
Taft, Miss Margaret, Ambler, Penna. 
Talbot, Mrs. M. L., Brookline 
Tarky, Mrs. William, Woburn 
Taunton, Mr. Davis, Jr., Wakefield 
Tavey, Miss Margaret, Cambridge 
Taylor, Mr. Frank W., Kittery, Maine 
Taylor, Mrs. Frederick B., Hingham 
Taylor, Mr. Ralph W., Saugus 
Teeter, Mrs. 0. E., Jr., Lexington 
Tennant, Mr. Charles W. J., Surrey, 

England 
Terwilliger, Mrs. H. L., Palo Alto, Calif. 
Thayer, Mrs. Charles M., Worcester 
Thayer, Professor Clark L., Amherst 
Thayer, Mr. Horace M., Catasauqua, 

Penna. 
Thayer, Mrs. Warren L., Hingham 
Theophile, Miss Gertrude M., Waban 
Thibodeau, Mr. John, Dorchester 
Thieme, Mrs. Anthony, Rockport 
Thomas, Mrs. Alfred, Weston 
Thomas, Mr. F. L., Mansfield 
Thomas, Mr. Hollis O., Boston 
Thompson, Mrs. Frank Graham, Devon, 

Penna. 
Thompson, Mrs. Frank I., Worcester 
Thompson, Miss Mable J., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Thornton, Mrs. Charles J., Wellesley 

Farms 
Thumin, Miss Frances, Newton 

Highlands 
Tibbetts, Miss Helen A., Swampscott 
Tiffany, Mr. Harold S., Weston 
Tilton, Mrs. Catherine 0., East Taunton 
Tilton, Mrs. Daisy W., Norwood 
Titcomb, Mr. James H., Sanford, Maine 
Tobey, Mr. Charles W., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Tobey, Mr. George B., Framingham 
Tofias, Mrs. Anna S., Brookline 
Tomelius, Miss Esther C, Cambridge 
Tower, Miss Ellen M., West Newton 
Tower, Mrs. Sidney S., East Pepperell 
Trask, Miss G. Hazel, Sterling Junction 
Trask, Miss Gladys, Danvers 
Tredick, Miss Helen F., Brookline 
Trickey, Miss E. C, Portland, Maine 
Tripp, Mrs. Philip E., Fall River 
Troup, Miss Agnes G., New York, N. Y. 
True, Mr. Thomas F., Dorchester 
Tucker, Miss E. D. M., Jamaica Plain 
Tucker, Mrs. William F., Worcester 
Tuttle, Mrs. Carrie E., Acton 



Tuttle, Mrs. Margaret P., Brookline 
Tyson, Mrs. John, Haverford, Penna. 
Upham, Miss Jessie I., Marblehead 
Urban, Rev. Leigh Roy, Longmeadow 
Ure, Mrs. Robert H., North Scituate 
Valentine, Mrs. J. A., South Walpole 
Van Buskirk, Miss Grace, Arlington 
Vannah, Mrs. Ruth S., Melrose 
Vannah, Mr. Thomas R., Melrose 
Van Wert, Mr. Irving B., Amherst 
Voorhees, Mr. Leighton S., Weymouth 
*Vose, Mrs. Alden, Westport, Conn. 
Voter, Miss Jennie A., South Portland, 

Maine 
Wagner, Miss Eva K., Dedham 
Wagner, Miss Gertrude, Hyde Park 
Wakefield, Mr. Lester H., Lunenburg 
Walker, Mrs. Clarence, East Orleans 
Walker, Mrs. Ross G., Belmont 
Wall, Mrs. Helen C, Boston ,.'.'.• ;7? 

Walsh, Mr. Arthur J., Danvers ; '*"■'" 
Walsh, Miss Irene M., Roxbury 
Walsh, Mrs. Robert A., Winthrop 
Walters, Mrs. H. C, Marblehead 
Ward, Mr. Kenneth, Manchester 
Ware, Mrs. Storer P., Westwood 
Warner, Mrs. Richard E., Taunton 
Waterhouse, Mr. H. Y., Brookline . 
Waterman, Mrs. W. D., Hanover, N. H. 
Watkins, Miss Mary S., Groton 
Watson, Mr. Harry L., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Weatherup, Mr. Thomas, Wayland 
Webber, Miss Josie, Boston 
Weidner, Mr. Wyntje S., Darien, Conn. 
Weitz, Mrs. Carl A., Cambridge 
Wellington, Mrs. W. O., Wollaston 
Wellman, Miss Florence G., Brattleboro, 

Vermont 
Wells, Mr. Charles A., Newton 
Wells, Mrs. D. W., West Newton 
Wells, Mrs. Lyde F., South Acton 
West, F. O., M.D., Woburn 
West, Mrs. H. T., Winchester 
Wetherell, Mrs. Marry Tarr, Rockport 
Wheat, Mrs. Arthur F., Manchester, 

N. H. 
Wheeler, Miss Marion G., Boston 
Wheeler, Miss Mildred A., Foxboro 
Wheeler, Mr. Oscar G., Waban 
Wheeler, Mr. T. L., Cambridge 
Wheeler, Mrs. W. D., Newton Centre 
Whipple, Mrs. Elmer E., Haverhill 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Howard, Boston 
White, Mrs. G. M., East Orleans 
White, Mrs. Harry C, Groton 
White, Mrs. Herbert F., Topsham 
Whitehouse, Mr. Maurice F., 

Moultonboro, N. H. 
Whitmore, Mr. Laurence, Needham 
Whiton, Mrs. Ross K., Concord 
Whittall, Mrs. James P., North Grafton 



108 



MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Whittemore, Mrs. Arthur E., Hingham 
Whitten, Mrs. George R., "West Newton 
Whittier, Mrs. "Warren F., Douglassville, 

Penna. 
Wightman, Mrs. F. A., Newtonville 
Wiley, Miss May E., Reading 
Williams, Mr. Bradford, Newton 
Williams, Mr. Purvis J., Washington, 

D. 0. 
Williams, Miss Ruth W., Boston 
Wills, Miss Grace, Boston 
Wilshire, Mrs. William W., Fosters, Ohio 
Wilson, Mrs. Charles H., New York, 

N. Y. 
Wilson, Mr. Howard P., Beverly 
Wilson, Mr. Maurice, Lynn 
Wilson, Mr. W. A., Saugus 
Winchell, Mrs. Guilbert, South Lincoln 
Wing, Mrs. Wilson G., Providence, R. I. 
Winslow, Mrs. Jane, West Hanover 
Winter, Mr. Howard, Westminster 



Wires, Mrs. E. Stanley, Wellesley Hills 
Wood, Mrs. Frederic E., Cambridge 
Wood, Mr. John F., Newton Centre 
Woodbine, Mrs. George, Guilford, Conn. 
Woodbridge, Mr. Charles C, Lynn 
Woodbury, Miss Evelyn, Gloucester 
Woodley, Mrs. George F., Jamaica Plain 
Woodman, Mr. W. R., Wakefield 
Woods, Dr. Charles E., Lunenburg 
Woodworth, Mrs. Frederick, Littleton 
Wright, Mrs. Frank H., Hingham 
Wrightington, Mr. Edgar N., Boston 
Wrightington, Mrs. Edgar N., Boston 
Wyman, Dr. Arnold, Jamaica Plain 
Yarian, Mr. Norman C, Bay Village, 

Ohio 
Yeomans, Mr. R. "V., Wellesley 
York, Mrs. Frederick, Milton 
Young, Dr. Edward W., New Bedford 
Zoccolante, Mr. Vincent, North Plymouth 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 

It is hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that 
it will not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to 
make their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and 
its investments are good, but the income from many of its 
investments has declined because of decreased returns from 
its bond holdings. Expenses have naturally increased with the 
constantly growing membership, and more money is needed to 
extend the activities of the Society beyond its present limits. 
The following form of bequest is suggested : 

FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed